how to make barcode in vb.net 2010 Design and Business Intelligence 393 in Software

Draw QR-Code in Software Design and Business Intelligence 393

16 Design and Business Intelligence 393
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ORDER_FACTS day_key customer_key product_key salesrep_key . . . order_dollars . . .
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CUSTOMER customer_key customer_id customer_name industry_group_key . . . INDUSTRY_GROUP industry_group_key industry_key primary_industry INDUSTRY industry_key industry_code industry_name . . .
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Expert Configuration Able to produce an impact report Double-counting is possible since some companies have multiple industries Novice Configuration Limited to single industry per company Avoids possibility of double-counting View: Customer with Primary Industry ORDER_FACTS day_key customer_key product_key salesrep_key . . . order_dollars . . . CUSTOMER customer_key customer_id customer_name industry_group_key . . . INDUSTRY_GROUP industry_group_key industry_key primary_industry WHERE primary_industry = 'Primary' INDUSTRY industry_key industry_code industry_name . . .
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Figure 16-10
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Two ways to leverage an attribute bridge table
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Business intelligence products that are dimensionally aware can be confused by bridge tables. Some tools identify fact tables by looking for tables that contain multiple foreign key columns. Since a bridge table fits this description, it may be classified as a fact table. This is acceptable, and may even be considered correct. In essence, a bridge table is a kind of
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Part VI
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NOTe A schema design can also avoid the many-to-many relationship by using each group exactly once. If the same salespeople collaborate on a second order, a second group will be created; if two companies have the same combination of industries, two groups will be created. This technique tends to generate overly large group tables and should, therefore, be avoided. Keep in mind, however, that it does not resolve the potential for double-counting. A single fact may still be associated with more than one instance of a dimension table or attribute. The many-to-many relationship has been resolved, but there is still a one-to-many that runs in the wrong direction. It will still be necessary to safeguard against double-counting.
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PART VI
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Tools and Documentation
factless fact table, associating each member with a group. If your business intelligence tool identifies it as such, you will want to be sure that it does not cause drill-across tactics to be invoked. In the case of a bridge, the potential Cartesian product is exactly what is wanted; drilling across will disrupt this behavior.
hierarchy Bridge Tables
A hierarchy bridge can be used to aggregate facts up or down a recursive hierarchy. Companies, for example, may be composed of other companies. If a fact table records transactions with each company, a hierarchy bridge can be used to roll them up to any level, regardless of how deep the hierarchy is. As described in 10, this is a common requirement, often found in organizational structures, geographic designations, and parts-breakdown arrangements. Since a hierarchy bridge table allows a single fact to be associated with any number of dimension attributes, it is once again necessary to take precautions when using it. If facts are to be aggregated up the hierarchy, the developer must constrain for a single top-level node. Alternatively, results may be grouped by top-level node, as long as grand totals are not created inside the report. In the case of companies, this means that using the hierarchy bridge to roll up orders requires selecting a single company to which they will be rolled up, or group results by company. Once again, this is an example of an impact report. It will likely be difficult to configure a business intelligence tool to generate SQL that meets these requirements. Even highly experienced developers may err, so once again a safe configuration is called for. In this case, the safe query environment does not involve the bridge at all; the dimension in question is linked directly to the fact table. Experienced developers can make use of a separate environment that exposes the bridge. For the star involving a hierarchy bridge, the story does not end here. There is at least one other configuration of tables that may be useful: one that allows facts to be summarized by looking up the hierarchy, rather than down. For example, it might be useful to choose a company and see whether any sales occurred at or above it in the hierarchy. As you learned in 10, this involves reversing the way in which the bridge table is joined to the fact table and dimension table. If you are using a business intelligence tool, this means that a third semantic layer will be called for. Figure 16-11 illustrates the possibilities. TIP A hierarchy bridge table, used incorrectly, leads to double-counting. For novice users, prevent business intelligence software from generating inaccurate queries by omitting the bridge. They will not be able to leverage the hierarchy but will be prevented from producing inaccurate reports. Expert developers will require two additional configurations, one used for looking down the hierarchy, the other for looking up. In addition to these three basic configurations, there are other possibilities. The many-tomany relationship in either expert configuration can be resolved by inserting an additional alias for the bridged table. In the case of looking down from a company, this additional instance of the company table would represent the subordinate, or child company. In the case of looking upward from a subordinate, it would represent the superior company, or parent. These configurations were illustrated in Figures 10-11 and 10-12, and represent the potential for still more semantic layers. A developer may also desire to produce a report looking for transactions above or below a group of companies, rather than a single company. This kind of question, which was
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