how to make barcode in vb.net 2010 SELLING IN UP MARKETS in Software

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Selling of heavily institutionally owned stock could occur in a strong up market. Sometimes even a fundamentally sound company that has satisfactory earnings growth and is 50 to 60 percent owned by institutions can experience a sell-off in a market rally. If the stock is not participating in the rally and shows light volume, with few buyers or sellers, some institutions become nervous and start to sell. Financial markets are tightening
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Institutions Show Where the Action Is Now
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their focus on the short term. If a stock is not matching the pace, they sell. Many believe there s too much focus on the short-term result. Indeed, the U.S. economy and financial system suffer from shorttermism, an affliction caused by a lack of attention to long-term economic performance. Financial markets put pressure on corporate managers to focus too much on quarterly profits and too little on patient investment for the long haul. The market continues to rally, but the nonparticipant just sits in the institution s portfolio. Eventually the institutional holders decide to sell the nonparticipant and buy a stock with more action. Sellers quickly outnumber buyers, and the stock price drops, even though the overall market is still advancing
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Some analysts claim that the percentage of institutional ownership is not as important as the number of institutions owning the stock. If 100 or 200 institutions own 70 percent of one stock, a problem will arise if they all sell at the same time. Obviously, no one can argue with that logic. However, there are three facts that somewhat offset the too-muchinstitutional-ownership debate: 1. Stocks with larger institutional ownership tend to be market leaders. 2. It is difficult to find a good stock that is not heavily owned by institutions. 3. If the institutions don t like the stock, significant price growth is unlikely.
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With institutional investors accounting for half of the market, avoiding them is nearly impossible. Even if it were possible to find a great stock before the herd thundered in, the price action would need the buying by institutions before it showed significant movement. For the value investor, institutional ownership should be a consideration, but it should not be the sole criterion on which to decide. Many companies have done well even though they have always had a high level of institutional ownership. Microsoft is a good example. Even now, more than 35 percent of the shares are owned by institutions. AT&T
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has 44.4 percent institutional ownership. General Electric has an institutional ownership of 49.9 percent. General Motors has 64.2 percent institutional ownership. It s a safe bet to say that few hesitate to own shares in any of these companies just because the institutional ownership is higher than average.
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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INSTITUTIONAL OWNERSHIP
Rather than trying to figure out whether the amount of institutional ownership is too high or too low, learn why the institutions like or dislike a stock. Why do they like General Motors and General Electric Why don t more of them like Apple Computer This type of analysis will give the individual investor a better idea of what gets the professionals excited. Understanding this can help with the stock selection process.
It Depends on Support and Resistance
Understanding the basic concept of support and resistance informs the
investor of the significance of stock market moves. It can send a signal of strength or weakness in a specific move. It can tell the likelihood.
THE DOW THEORY
The idea of market support and resistance goes back to the Dow theory, originated by Charles Dow and further developed by a later editor of the Wall Street Journal, William Hamilton. Support is a point in a declining stock market where buyers start buying. Resistance is the point where sellers start selling. When a market declines, analysts look lower for the next area of support. The strength of an area of support is determined by how many times the level stopped former declines. If it stopped only once, it is weak support. If market declines stopped at the same level more than once, it is stronger support. When the market falls through strong support, it has a tendency to drop much further. Resistance, the opposite of support, is a level where stock market advances stopped in the past, where stock buyers stopped buying. If advances were stopped only once or maybe twice, it is weak resistance. If several advances were stopped, it is stronger resistance. When the market breaks through resistance, it tends to rise much higher. Sometimes support or resistance levels are at precisely the same point. Other times they are not so exact but rather are a range of support or resistance.
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