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Appendix E
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As mentioned previously, MPEG is actually a collection of standards, each suited to a particular application or group of applications, including:
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MPEG-1, the original implementation, targeted at multimedia uses. The MPEG-1 algorithm is intended basically for compact disk bit rates of approximately 1.5 2.0 Megabits per second. MPEG-1 supports 525- and 625-type signal structures in progressive form (i.e., non-interlaced) with 204/288 lines per frame, sequential-scan frame rates of 29.97 and 25 frames per second and 352 pixels per line. The coding of high-motion signals does not produce particularly good results, however. As might be expected, as the bit rate is reduced (compression ratio increased), the output video quality gradually declines. The overall bit rate reduction ratios achievable are about 6:1 with a bit rate of 6 Megabits per second and 200:1 at 1.5 Megabits per second. The MPEG-1 system is not symmetrical; the compression side is more complex and expensive than the decompression process, making the system ideal for broadcast-type applications in which there are far more decoders than encoders. MPEG-2, which offers full ITU-R Rec. 601 resolution for professional broadcast uses and is the chosen standard for the American ATSC DTV system and the European DVB suite of applications. MPEG-3, originally targeted at high-definition imaging applications. Subsequent to development of the standard, however, key specifications of MPEG-3 were absorbed into MPEG-2. MPEG-3 was stillborn and is no longer in use. MPEG-4, a standard that uses very low bit rates for teleconferencing, streaming, and related applications requiring high bit efficiency and user interactivity. Like MPEG-2, MPEG-4 is a collection of tools that can be grouped into profiles and levels for different applications. The MPEG-4 video coding structure ranges from a very low bit rate video (VLBV) level, which includes algorithms and tools for data rates between 5 kilobits per second and 64 kilobits per second, to ITU-R. Rec. 601 quality video at 2 Megabits per second and beyond to 2 Gigabits per second streams with 4k 2k image size. MPEG-4 does not concern itself directly with the error protection required for specific channels, such as cellular radio, but it has made improvements in the way payload bits are arranged so that recovery is more robust (error resilience). MPEG-7, is not a compression scheme at all. It is a metadata description scheme for media assets. MPEG-7 is an attempt to provide a standard means of describing multimedia content.
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Video and Audio Compression
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MPEG-21, is not a compression scheme either. It is an attempt to standardize media transaction information, such as when the owner of a piece of streaming media content sells a viewer the right to view it, for example.
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Profiles and Levels
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For historical completeness, MPEG-2 s profiles and levels are discussed below. The MPEG-4 profiles, including those most relevant to streaming media, are described in Appendix A. MPEG-2 s profiles are found in television production plants and much of this content is repurposed for streaming media application, so it is important to understand these upstream compression profiles. Streaming media encoders that simply transcode between MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 without decompressing are still rare. In cases where MPEG-2 is used in production, the video is typically decompressed and rendered to baseband prior to re-encoding into MPEG-4. This is wasteful, since much of the required math to compress the video into MPEG-4 format has already been done to get the video into MPEG-2 format. Unfortunately, this data cannot yet be directly reused by most commercially available streaming media encoders. Six profiles and four levels describe the organization of the basic MPEG-2 standard. A profile is a subset of the MPEG-2 bit stream syntax with restrictions on the parts of the MPEG algorithm used. Profiles are analogous to features, describing the available characteristics. A level constrains general parameters such as image size, data rate, and decoder buffer size. Levels describe, in essence, the upper bounds for a given feature and are analogous to performance specifications. By far the most popular element of the MPEG-2 standard for professional video applications is the Main Profile in conjunction with the Main Level (described in the jargon of MPEG as Main Profile/Main Level), which gives an image size of 720 576, a data rate of 15 megabits per second, and a frame rate of 30 frames per second. All higher profiles are capable of decoding Main Profile/Main Level streams. Table E.3 lists the basic MPEG-2 classifications. With regard to the table, the following generalizations can be made:
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The three key flavors of MPEG-2 are: Main Profile/Low Level (source input format, or SIF) Main Profile/Main Level (Main) Studio Profile/Main Level (Studio)
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TABLE E.3 Common MPE Profiles and Levels in Simplified Form (After [2])
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Level General Profile Simple Specifications Pictures: I, P Chroma: 4:2:0 Parameter Image size1 Image frequency2 Bit rate3 Image size Image frequency Bit rate Image size Image frequency Bit rate Image size Image frequency Bit rate 325 30 4 288 Low Main (ITU 601) 720 30 15 720 30 15 720 30 15 576
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