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10.01 Identify Security Restrictions That Java Technology Environments Normally Impose on Applets Running in a Browser Given an Architectural System Specification, Identify Appropriate Locations for Implementation of Specified Security Features and Select Suitable Technologies for Implementation of Those Features
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n an enterprise computing environment, the failure, compromise, or lack of availability of computing resources can jeopardize the life of the enterprise. To survive, an enterprise must identify, minimize, and, where possible, eliminate threats to the security of enterprise computing system resources. Resources for our purposes refer to goods and services. A good is a tangible property that is, the physical server. A service is an intangible property such as software or data. A threat against a resource is basically an unauthorized use of a good or a service.
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Out of the box, Java provides the ability for class code to be easily downloaded and executed. From the point of view of security, the easily downloaded code poses a threat because it may be possible for the code to access enterprise data resources. Therefore, it is important that your system be able to distinguish between code that can be trusted and code that cannot. The Java security model takes into consideration the origin of the classes, and perhaps who signed them, when it permits or denies operations. This chapter concentrates on threats to services (software and data) and how Java and Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (JEE) fit into the scheme of things. JEE applications do not obviate existing enterprise security infrastructure; they do, however, have value when integrated with existing infrastructures. The JEE application model leverages existing security services as opposed to requiring new services. This chapter begins with a brief review of threats to security, followed by a look at the security restrictions that Java technology environments normally impose on applets running in a browser. Then an overview of Java and some of its security and related APIs is presented. The rest of the chapter describes the security concerns and explores the application of JEE security mechanisms to the design, implementation, and deployment of secure enterprise applications, this includes the use of Java 5 s Annotation facility. Threats to enterprise resources fall into a few general categories that can overlap, as shown in Table 10-1. Depending on the environment in which an enterprise application operates, these threats manifest themselves in different forms. For example, in a nondistributed system environment, a threat of disclosure might manifest itself in the vulnerability of information kept in files for example, a client/server .INI file with user identities, passwords, IP addresses, and listener ports for enterprise databases.
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TABLE 10-1
Threats to Enterprise Resources
Threat
Compromise of accountability
Description
In legal parlance, this is known as fraud in the impersonation or identity theft. Someone is masquerading as another user. Enterprise data is intentionally, negligently, or accidentally made available to parties who have no legal right to know. Enterprise data is intentionally, negligently, or accidentally modified. In legal parlance, this is known as theft of service ; the perpetrator is accessing an enterprise computer system and using the system to perform, on its behalf, services that provide illegal gain or purpose. The service misappropriation or data modification causes an interruption of the enterprise system.
Example Result of Threat Execution
UserX logs on as UserY. UserX uses UserY s identity to make system requests and is afforded all rights and permissions of UserY. Patient medical record compromised; bank account number compromised.
Disclosure of confidential information
Modification of information
Corporate money account balance modified; computer virus stored on an enterprise server. UserX gains access to the lottery system and causes the system to create a winning ticket for UserX.
Misappropriation of protected resources
Misappropriation that compromises availability
Computer virus causes enterprise server to be unusable; a hacker causes the Amazon.com e-commerce server(s) to be unavailable.
In a distributed system, the code that performs business operations may be spread across multiple servers. A request will trigger the execution of code based on a server, and that code could possibly manipulate enterprise data. To prevent a threat to security, it is important that trusted requests be distinguished from those that are not. The server must verify the identity of the caller to evaluate whether the caller is permitted to execute the code. The client may also want to verify the identity of the server before engaging in the transaction for example, the consumer will not want to send a credit card number to www.stealyourcreditcard.com. A distributed system is typically made up of code executing on behalf of different principals (uniquely identified users or machines within the system). To obviate threats, the server requires that the caller provide credentials that are known only to the caller, as proof of identity. The credentials are then checked and verified with an authority, in what is known as the authentication process. Authenticated callers are then checked to determine whether they are permitted to access the requested resource; this is known as authorization. These are the fundamental phases in security threat prevention.
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