qr code vb.net library Electric Current. Ohm s Law in VS .NET

Create ANSI/AIM Code 128 in VS .NET Electric Current. Ohm s Law

CHAPTER 2 Electric Current. Ohm s Law
Code 128 Decoder In .NET Framework
Using Barcode Control SDK for VS .NET Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Code 128 Creator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in VS .NET applications.
IR volts. Note that, from eq. (21), we have the three relationships V IRT V I R1 R2 Rn V IR1 IR2 IRn 22 23 24
Decode Code 128 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Barcode Encoder In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in VS .NET applications.
where V is the battery voltage, or applied voltage as it is generally called. From inspection of eq. (24) we have the important fact that In a series circuit, the applied voltage is equal to the sum of the voltage drops. It should be pointed out that the voltage drop across a resistor is always from plus to minus in the direction of the current ow, a fact illustrated in Fig. 24.
Scanning Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Create Code 128 Code Set B In Visual C#
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 image in .NET framework applications.
Fig. 24
Code 128B Creation In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in ASP.NET applications.
Generate Code 128 In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in VS .NET applications.
It should be noted, in Fig. 24, that the battery voltage is from minus to plus in the direction of the current; thus the battery voltage is exactly opposite to the sum of the voltage drops across the resistors, which corresponds, in the electric circuit, to Newton s third law in mechanics, that is, an applied force is always balanced by an equal and opposite force. Let us next consider the power relations in a series circuit. First, by eqs. (15), (16), and (17), a battery of V volts delivers a total power output of P watts given by any of the relationships P VI V 2 =RT I 2 RT 25
GS1 DataBar Generator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar Stacked image in VS .NET applications.
1D Barcode Creation In .NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create 1D Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
where RT and I are given by eqs. (20) and (21). Since power is a scalar quantity, it follows that the total power P is equal to the sum of the powers developed in the individual resistors, that is, P P1 P2 P3 Pn 26
GTIN - 128 Drawer In .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Making ANSI/AIM ITF 25 In VS .NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create USS ITF 2/5 image in .NET framework applications.
where the individual powers are found by applying eqs. (15), (16), and (17) to each individual resistor, using the voltage drop associated with each resistor. To be more speci c, let Rx be the value of any one of a number of resistors in series, such as in Figs. 23 and 24. If Vx is the voltage drop across Rx , then Px , the power input to Rx , is Px IVx
Code 128 Code Set A Creation In .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code128 image in ASP.NET applications.
Decode ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
2 Px Vx =Rx
Code 39 Full ASCII Reader In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Code 128 Reader In C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
by eq: 15 by eq: 16 by eq: 17
UCC-128 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creation for Office Excel Control to generate, create EAN128 image in Microsoft Excel applications.
Code 39 Drawer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Online applications.
Px I 2 Rx
Encoding USS-128 In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Reporting Service applications.
Making Code 128C In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in Java applications.
CHAPTER 2 Electric Current. Ohm s Law
Since the voltage drop across a resistor is the current times the resistance (by eq. (13)), we have that the voltage drop across a series resistor Rx is equal to Vx IRx and since, from eq. (21) I V=RT we have that Vx V Rx =RT 27
which is the value of Vx to be used in any of the above equations for Px . RT is the sum of all the series resistances, including Rx , and V is the applied battery voltage. Let us now conclude this section with a discussion of several topics of importance in all circuit work, beginning with the voltmeter and the ammeter. As the names imply, a voltmeter is an instrument for measuring voltage and an ammeter is an instrument for measuring amperes, that is, current. It is not our purpose, at this time, to explain the inner workings of these devices, but only to describe how they are connected in a circuit to measure voltage or current. A voltmeter is used to measure the voltage (potential di erence) between any two V points in a circuit, such as in the two gures below, where * is the voltmeter.
In the left-hand gure the voltmeter is connected to read the voltage drop across R2 only, while in the right-hand gure it reads the sum of the voltage drops across R2 and R3 . It should be pointed out that a voltmeter is constructed to have a very high internal resistance, so that it will have negligible e ect on any circuit it is connected to. On the other hand, an ammeter, since it measures current, must be connected in I series in the circuit, as in the gure below, where * is the ammeter.
Since an ammeter is connected directly in the current path, an ammeter must be constructed to have a very LOW internal resistance, so that it will o er negligible resistance to the current owing through it, and thus not cause any change in the current it is put in to measure. Another point to be mentioned is that all practical sources of emf, including batteries, have internal resistance to a greater or less degree. For a battery, the internal resistance can be denoted by Rb and is included in the symbol for the battery, as shown in Fig. 25, where and are the external positive and negative terminals of the battery. Internal resistance is undesirable in a battery or other type of generator for several reasons. First of all, when the battery delivers current there is an internal power loss in the battery, equal to I 2 Rb , which not only lowers the e ciency of the battery but may cause it to overheat and thus shorten its life.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.