qr code generator vb.net Fig. 99A in VS .NET

Paint Code-128 in VS .NET Fig. 99A

Fig. 99A
Code-128 Recognizer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for VS .NET Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Code128 Creator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 image in VS .NET applications.
Fig. 99B
Decode Code 128B In VS .NET
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Draw Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Fig. 99C
Decode Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Printing Code 128A In C#
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
CHAPTER 5 Sinusoidal Waves. rms Value
Making Code 128 Code Set C In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in ASP.NET applications.
Paint Code 128B In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in .NET applications.
With the foregoing in mind, let us return to Fig. 91, and also to Fig. 93, which is the phasor diagram for Fig. 91. In Fig. 91 we indicate a current i Ip sin !t b ; but notice that we do not show the phasor for this current in Fig. 93. Our object now, therefore, is to add, to the phasor diagram of Fig. 93, phasors that will account for the CURRENT, i Ip sin !t b , that ows in Fig. 91. This can be done by calling upon the extremely useful principle of superposition (problem 50, section 4.4) as follows. By the principle of superposition, the total e ect of the two generators in Fig. 91 is the same as if each generator acted separately, producing its own separate component of current, the vector sum of the two components of current being equal to the total current. Since, in Fig. 91, the load is a pure resistance of R ohms, we know that each of the two current components will be in phase with the generator voltage that produces it. Thus, if we let Ip1 and Ip2 be the peak values of currents produced separately by generator voltages Vp1 and Vp2 , then Fig. 93 can be redrawn to include the CURRENT PHASORS Ip1 and Ip2 , as shown in Fig. 100.
Make GS1 - 13 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Generating Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET applications.
Fig. 100
Generate UPC A In .NET Framework
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in VS .NET applications.
Make European Article Number 8 In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create GTIN - 8 image in .NET applications.
Now let us multiply the magnitudes of all four vectors in Fig. 100 by 0.7071; this will not change the angle a in any way, but the lengths (magnitudes) of the vectors will now represent rms values instead of peak values. Let us denote the rms values of voltage by V1 and V2 (as we do in Figs. 95 and 96), and then let I1 and I2 denote the rms currents produced by the rms voltages V1 and V2 . Now let V denote the vector sum of the rms voltages V1 and V2 , as shown in Fig. 96. Then let I denote the vector sum of the rms currents I1 and I2 ; it then follows that the resultant rms vector I lies in the same direction as the resultant rms voltage vector V,* as shown in Fig. 101. (Fig. 101 is thus the same as Fig. 96 except the current vectors have been added and the gure increased in size somewhat.)
Drawing Code 3 Of 9 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code39 image in ASP.NET applications.
Paint DataMatrix In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Java applications.
Fig. 101
Decode Code128 In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
GS1 - 12 Creation In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in Java applications.
* There must be zero phase shift between V and the current I it produces in a purely resistive circuit, as emphasized in Fig. 99.
Reading Code 128A In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Printing DataMatrix In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPad Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPad applications.
CHAPTER 5 Sinusoidal Waves. rms Value
Data Matrix ECC200 Creation In Java
Using Barcode printer for BIRT reports Control to generate, create ECC200 image in BIRT reports applications.
1D Maker In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create Linear 1D Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Figure 101 is thus the COMPLETE VECTOR DIAGRAM for the purely resistive circuit of Fig. 91, in which the lengths of the vectors represent constant rms values of voltage and current. Note that V is the vector sum of generator voltages V1 and V2 , while I is the vector sum of generator currents I1 and I2 . Since Fig. 91 is a resistive circuit, note that I1 is in phase with V1 , I2 is in phase with V2 , and the overall resultant current I is in phase with the overall resultant voltage V (all as shown in the manner of Fig. 99C). We again emphasize that Fig. 101 does not represent an instantaneous time relationship, but depicts the constant phase relationships of the vectors representing the various constant rms values of current and voltage. Also, comparison of Figs. 101 and 91 shows that the constant angle b, originally used in Fig. 91, is really the same as the angle h in Fig. 101; that is, h is the constant angle between the current wave i and the reference voltage wave v1 in Fig. 91. Relationships expressed in vector diagram form, such as in Fig. 101, are, of course, also expressible in algebraic form, using either the bar or polar notation (see example 1). " For example, Fig. 101 shows graphically that the total resultant rms voltage V , appear"1 and V2 ; " ing between terminals c and d in Fig. 91, is equal to the vector sum of voltages V this fact can be expressed algebraically by writing that, in Fig. 101, the general statement can be made that " " " V V1 V2 or as V =h V1 =0 V2 =a in which the angles deboted by h and a will be expressed in either degrees or radians. In the " last equation, V1 is taken to be the reference vector at zero degrees or radians, with the " total resultant voltage having a magnitude of V volts at an angle h relative to the V1 vector. " In any given case, the value of a resultant vector, V V =, is equal to the vector sum of all the horizontal and vertical components of all the individual vectors involved, as explained in example 1. The above statements made concerning voltages apply, of course, to currents; thus " " " " I I1 I2 I3 " where I is the overall resultant current, equal to the vector sum of all the component " " " vector currents I1 , I2 , I3 , and so on, the magnitudes of all currents being in rms amperes, as usual. Next, the basic OHM S LAW, rst stated for the dc case in section 2.3, now becomes, for the ac case, the vector relationship " " V I R 111
" " where I rms vector current, V applied rms vector voltage, and R is resistance in ohms. R is a scalar quantity, there being no sense of direction associated with resistance. It should be noted that eq. (111) applies to a circuit, such as Fig. 91, in which a number of di erent generators, all of the same frequency but having various phase relations with respect to one another, are applied to a common load resistance of R ohms. (Equation (107) in section 5.5 can be written in the simpler form I V=R, because just one generator of voltage V is being considered in the discussion of this equation.)
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.