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There are several types of mass storage (besides the hard drive) in which data can be kept in large quantities. Computer experts categorize mass storage in two ways: access time and cost per megabyte. In general, the less the access time (that is, the faster the storage medium), the greater the cost per megabyte. The fastest mass storage media usually have the lowest capacity.
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Flash memory is an all-electronic form of storage that is useful especially in highlevel graphics, big-business applications, and scientific work. The capacity is comparable to that of a small hard drive, but there are no moving parts. Because there are no mechanical components, flash memory is faster than any other mass-storage scheme. PC cards (also called PCMCIA cards) are credit-card-sized, removable components, some of which are designed to serve as removable flash memory.
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Magnetic diskettes, also called (imprecisely) floppies, are 3.5 inches in diameter and enclosed in a rigid, square case about 4 millimeters thick. They can be interchanged in seconds, so there is no limit to how much data you can put on them. But their capacity, individually, is limited. A full-wall bookcase of diskettes could hold more work than you d create in your lifetime. Zip and Jaz disks (trademarks of Iomega Corporation) are slightly larger than 3.5inch diskettes in physical dimension, but vastly larger in storage capacity. The original
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Random-access memory 629 Zip disks can hold about 100 MB of data; newer ones can hold 250 MB. Jaz disks hold about 1 GB. There are several variants on the Zip/Jaz theme, produced by various manufacturers. All these disk types require special drives. Some new computers include built-in Zip drives. A popular mass-storage medium is compact-disk, read-only memory (CD-ROM). You can buy CD-ROMs for various applications. They are commonly used for commercial software and also to store reference materials such as dictionaries and telephone directories. The main asset of CD-ROM is its fairly large capacity and its long shelf life. The main drawback is that the medium cannot be erased and overwritten, unless you are willing to spend the money for a compact-disk, recordable (CD-R) drive.
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The earliest computers used magnetic tape to store data. This is still done in some systems. You can get a tape drive for making an emergency backup of the data on your hard drive, or for archiving data you rarely need to use. Magnetic tape has very high storage capacity. There are microcassettes that can hold more than 1 GB of data; standard cassettes can hold many gigabytes. But tapes are extremely slow because, unlike their disk-shaped counterparts, they are a serial-access storage medium. This means that the data bits are written in a string, one after another, along the entire length of the tape. The drive might have to mechanically rewind or fast-forward through a football field s length of tape to get to a particular data bit, whereas on a disk medium, the read/write head never has to travel further than the diameter of the disk to reach a given data bit.
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In a computer, the term random-access memory (RAM) refers to integrated circuits (ICs) that store working data. The amount, and speed, of memory is a crucial factor in determining what a computer can and cannot do.
Data flow
Figure 33-3 shows how data moves between a hard drive or diskette and the memory, controlled by the CPU. When you open a file on your hard drive or on a diskette, the data goes immediately into the memory. The CPU, under direction of the microprocessor, manipulates the data in the memory as you work on the file. Thus, the data in memory changes from moment to moment. When you hit a key to add a character, or drag the mouse to draw a line that shows up on your display, that character or line goes into memory at the same time. If you hit the backspace key to delete a character, or drag the mouse to erase a line on the screen, it disappears from the memory. During this time the original file on the disk stays as it was before you accessed it. No change is made to the disk data until you specifically instruct the computer to overwrite the data on the disk. When you re done working on a file, you tell the microprocessor to close it. Then the data leaves memory and goes back to the hard drive or diskette from which it came, or to some other place, as you might direct. If you tell the computer to overwrite the file on the disk from which it came, many programs send the new data (containing the
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