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Modems work at various speeds, usually measured in bits per second (bps). You will often hear about kilobits per second (kbps), where 1 kbps 1000 bps, or megabits per second (Mbps), where 1 Mbps 1000 kbps. Sometimes you ll hear about speed units called the baud and kilobaud. (A kilobaud is 1000 baud.) Baud and bps are almost the same units, but not they are not identical. People often use the term baud when they really mean bps. The higher the speed as specified in bps, the faster the data is sent and received through the modem. Speeds keep increasing as computer communications technology advances. Modems are rated according to the highest data speed they can handle, in bits per second (bps), kilobits per second (kbps), or megabits per second (Mbps). A typical telephone modem works at about 56 kbps. Digital-subscriber-line (DSL) modems work somewhat faster, around 128 kbps. Television cable modems can work upward of 1 Mbps.
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Figure 33-4 is a block diagram of a modem suitable for interfacing a home or business computer with the telephone line. The modulator, or D/A converter, changes the digital computer data into audio tones. The demodulator, or A/D converter, changes the incoming audio tones into digital signals for the computer. The audio tones fall within the frequency range, or band, of approximately 300 Hz to 3 kHz. This is the band needed to clearly transmit a human voice. It s amazing how much computer data can race over a single telephone or radio circuit having such a narrow bandwidth. Even pictures can be sent and received in brilliant color and in quite good detail (high resolution). As you might imagine, color images take longer than gray-scale images to send and receive; also, the more detail an image contains, the longer it takes to be transferred at any given data speed.
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The Internet is a worldwide system, or network, of computers. It got started in the late 1960s, originally conceived as a network that could survive nuclear war. Back then it was called ARPAnet, named after the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) of the United States federal government.
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When people began to connect their computers into ARPAnet, the need became clear for a universal set of standards, called a protocol, to ensure that all the
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33-4 Block diagram of a computer modem.
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machines speak the same language. The modern Internet is such that you can use any type of computer IBM-compatible, Mac, or other and take advantage of all the network s resources. All Internet activity consists of computers talking to one another. This occurs in machine language. However, the situation is vastly more complicated than when data goes from one place to another within a single computer. In the Internet (often called simply the Net), data must often go through several different computers to get from the transmitting or source computer to the receiving or destination computer. These intermediate computers are called nodes, servers, hosts, or Internet service providers (ISPs). Millions of people are simultaneously using the Net; the most efficient route between a given source and destination can change from moment to moment. The Net is set up in such a way that signals always try to follow the most efficient route. If you are connected to a distant computer, say a machine at the National Hurricane Center, the requests you make of it and the data it sends you, are broken into small units called packets. Each packet coming to you has, in effect, your computer s name written on it. But not all packets necessarily travel the same route through the network. Ultimately, all the packets are reassembled into the data you want, say, the infrared satellite image of a hurricane, even though they might not arrive in the same order they were sent. Figure 33-5 is a simplified drawing of Internet data transfer for a hypothetical file containing five packets transferred during a period of extremely heavy usage. Nodes are shown as black dots surrounded by circles. In this example, some packets pass through more nodes, and/or over a much greater physical distance, than others. If Net traffic were very light, all the packets might follow the same route through fewer nodes. This is why it takes longer to acquire data on the Net during peak hours of use, as compared with times when there are comparatively few people connected into it. A file
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