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At A, simplified drawing of the construction of a rotary potentiometer. At B, schematic symbol.
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Audio or logarithmic taper
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There are some applications for which linear taper potentiometers don t work well. The volume control of a radio receiver is a good example. Your ear/brain perceives sound level according to the logarithm of its true level. If you use a linear taper potentiometer as the volume control of a transistor radio or other sound system, the level will seem to go up too slowly in some parts of the control range and too fast in other parts of the control range. To compensate for the way in which people perceive sound level, an audio taper potentiometer is used. In this device, the resistance between the center and end terminal increases in a nonlinear way. This type of potentiometer is sometimes called a logarithmic-taper device. If the shaft is all the way counterclockwise, the volume at the speaker is zero or near zero. If you turn the shaft 30 degrees clockwise, the volume increases to some perceived level; call it one sound unit. If you then turn the volume 30 degrees further clockwise, the volume will seem to go up to two sound units. But in fact it has increased much more than this, in terms of actual sound power. You perceive sound not as a direct function of the true volume, but in units that are based on the logarithm of the intensity. Audio-taper potentiometers are manufactured so that as you turn the shaft, the sound seems to increase in a smooth, natural way. A graph of resistance versus shaft displacement for an audio-taper potentiometer is shown in Fig. 6-10.
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The decibel 107
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Resistance-vs-displacement curve for linear taper potentiometer.
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Resistance-vs-displacement curve for audio-taper potentiometer.
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This is a good time to sidetrack for a moment and exarnine how sound sensation is measured.
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The decibel
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Perceived levels of sound, and of other phenomena such as light and radio signals, change according to the logarithm of the actual power level. Units have been invented to take this into account.
108 Resistors The fundamental unit of sound change is called the decibel, abbreviated dB. A change of 1 dB is the minimum increase in sound level that you can detect, if you are expecting it. A change of 1 dB is the minimum detectable decrease in sound volume, when you are anticipating the change. Increases in volume are positive decibel values; decreases in volume are negative values. If you aren t expecting the level of sound to change, then it takes about 3 dB or -3 dB of change to make a noticeable difference.
Calculating decibel values
Decibel values are calculated according to the logarithm of the ratio of change. Suppose a sound produces a power of P watts on your eardrums, and then it changes (either getting louder or softer) to a level of Q watts. The change in decibels is obtained by dividing out the ratio Q/P, taking its base-10 logarithm, and then multiplying the result by 10: dB = 10 log (Q/P) As an example, suppose a speaker emits 1 W of sound, and then you turn up the volume so that it emits 2 W of sound power. Then P = 1 and Q = 2, and dB = 10 log (2/1) = 10 log 2 = 10 0.3 = 3 dB. This is the minimum detectable level of volume change if you aren t expecting it: a doubling of the actual sound power. If you turn the volume level back down again, then P/Q = 1/2 = 0.5, and you can calculate dB = 10 log 0.5 = 10 -0.3 = 3 dB. A change of plus or minus 10 dB is an increase or decrease in sound power of 10 times. A change of plus or minus 20 dB is a hundredfold increase or decrease in sound power. It is not unusual to encounter sounds that range in loudness over plus/minus 60 dB or more a millionfold variation.
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