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Practical Magnetism 125
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The Relay A relay makes use of a solenoid to allow remote-control switching of high-current circuits. A diagram of a relay is shown in Fig. 8-8. The movable lever, called the armature, is held to one side by a spring when there is no current flowing through the electromagnet. Under these conditions, terminal X is connected to Y, but not to Z. When a sufficient current is applied, the armature is pulled over to the other side. This disconnects terminal X from terminal Y, and connects X to Z. There are numerous types of relays. Some are meant for use with dc, and others are for ac; a few will work with either dc or ac. A normally closed relay completes the circuit when there is no current flowing in its electromagnet coil, and breaks the circuit when current flows through the coil. A normally open relay is just the opposite, completing the circuit when current flows through the electromagnet coil, and opening the circuit when current ceases to flow through the coil. Normal, in this context, refers to the condition of no current applied to the electromagnet. The relay shown in Fig. 8-8 can be used as either a normally open or normally closed relay, depending on which contacts are selected. It can also be used to switch a line between two different circuits.
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of a simple relay. At B, the schematic symbol for the same relay.
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Some relays have several sets of contacts. Some relays are meant to remain in one state (either with current or without) for a long time, while others are meant to switch several times per second. The fastest relays can operate several dozen times per second. In recent years, relays have been largely supplanted by switching transistors and diodes, except in applications where extremely high current or high voltage is involved.
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The DC Motor Magnetic forces can be harnessed to do work. One common device that converts direct-current energy into rotating mechanical energy is a dc motor. In a dc motor, the source of electricity is connected to a set of coils, producing magnetic fields. The attraction of opposite poles, and the repulsion of like poles, is switched in such a way that a constant torque, or rotational force, results. As the current in the coils increases, the torque that the motor can provide also increases. Figure 8-9 is a simplified, cutaway drawing of a dc motor. One set of coils, called the armature coil, rotates along with the motor shaft. The other set of coils, called the field coil, is stationary. The current direction is periodically reversed during each rotation by means of the commutator. This keeps the rotational force going in the same angular direction, so the motor continues to rotate rather than oscillating back and forth. The shaft is carried along by its own inertia, so that it doesn t come to a stop during those instants when the current is being switched in polarity. Some dc motors can also be used to generate dc. These motors contain permanent magnets in place of one of the sets of coils. When the shaft is rotated, a pulsating dc flows in the coil.
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Magnetic Tape Magnetic tape, also called recording tape, consists of millions of ferromagnetic particles attached to a flexible, thin plastic strip. In the tape recorder, a fluctuating magnetic field, produced by the recording head, polarizes these particles. As the field changes in strength next to the recording head, the tape passes by at a constant speed. This produces regions in which the ferromagnetic particles are polarized in either direction (Fig. 8-10). When the tape is run at the same speed through the recorder in the playback mode, the magnetic fields around the individual particles cause a fluctuating field that is detected by the pickup head. This field has the same pattern of variations as the original field from the recording head. Magnetic tape is available in various widths and thicknesses. Thicker tapes result in cassettes that don t play as long, but the tape is more resistant to stretching. The speed of the tape determines the fidelity of the recording. Higher speeds are preferred for music and video, and lower speeds for voice and data. The impulses on a magnetic tape can be distorted or erased by external magnetic fields. Therefore, tapes should be protected from such fields. Keep the tape away from magnets. Extreme heat can also result in loss of data, and can cause permanent physical damage to the tape.
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