barcode generator in vb.net Figure 4-26 Brig. General David Sarnoff. in Software

Encoding EAN / UCC - 13 in Software Figure 4-26 Brig. General David Sarnoff.

Figure 4-26 Brig. General David Sarnoff.
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along at a stately 15 inches per second (IPS). To meet the bandwidth requirements of the video signal, the tape had to be accelerated to somewhere between 300 and 400 inches per second, roughly 25 miles per hour. To put this into perspective, a tape that would accommodate an hour s worth of audio in those days would hold one minute of video, which did not take into account the length of the leader that had to be in place to enable the recorder to reach its ridiculously high tape transport speed. To hold 15 minutes of video, a reel of quarter-inch tape would have had to be three feet in diameter, not exactly portable. Put another way, a one-hour show would require 25 miles of tape! To get around this problem, Camras invented the spinning record head. Instead of moving the tape rapidly past the recording head, he moved the tape slowly and rapidly spun the head. By attaching the head to a 20,000-rpm Hoover vacuum cleaner motor (stolen, by the way, from his wife s vacuum cleaner), he was able to use two-inch tape and reduce the tape transport speed to 30 to 40 inches per second, a dramatic improvement. The first video demonstrations were admirable, but rather funny. First of all, the resolution of the television was only 40 lines per inch compared to more than 250 on modern systems. The images were so poor that audiences required a narrator to tell them what they were seeing on the screen. Luckily, other advances followed. The original video systems rendered black-and-white images, but soon a color system was developed. It recorded five tracks (red, blue, green, synch, and audio) on half-inch tape and ran at the original speed of 360 ips. The system was a bit unwieldy. It required a mile of color tape to capture a four-minute recording. Obviously, mile-long tapes were unacceptable, especially if they would only yield four-minute programs. As a result, the Sarnoff/Ampex team reexamined the design of the recording mechanism. Three scientists, Charles Ginsburg, Alex Maxey, and Ray Dolby (later to be known for his work in audio), redesigned the rotating record head, rotating it about 90 degrees so that the video signal was now written on the tape in a zigzag design. This redesign, combined with FM instead of AM signal modulation, enabled the team to reduce the tape speed to a remarkable 171/2 inches per second. For comparison s sake, modern machines consume tape at about 21/2 inches per second. This, by the way, is why the record head in your home VCR sits at a funny angle (it s that big silver cylinder you see when you open the slot where the tape is inserted, as shown in Figure 4-27).
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Figure 4-27 Video record head in modern VCR. Note angle of head.
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By 1956, Sarnoff and Ampex had created a commercially viable product. They demonstrated the Mark IV to 200 CBS affiliate managers in April of that year. When David Sarnoff walked out on the stage and stood next to his own prerecorded image playing on the television next to him, the room went berserk. In four days, Ampex took $5M in video machine orders.
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Modern Video Technology
Today s palm-size videotape recorders are a far cry from the washerdryer-size Mark IV of 1956. But physical dimensions are only a piece of the video story. The first video systems were analog and relied on a technique called composite video. In composite video, all of the signal components, such as color, brightness, audio, and so on, are combined into a single multiplexed signal. Because of the interleaved nature of this technique, a composite signal is not particularly good and suffers from such impairments as clarity loss between generations (in much the same way an analog audio signal suffers over distance) and color bleeding. Unfortunately, bandwidth at the time was extremely expensive and the cost to transport five distinct high-bandwidth channels was inordinately high. Composite video therefore was a reasonable alternative. As the cost of bandwidth dropped in concert with advances in transmission technology, component video emerged, in which the signal components were transported separately, each in its own channel. This eliminated many of the impairments that plagued composite systems. Several distinct component formats have emerged, including RGB (for red-green-blue), YUV (for Luminance [Y], Hue [U], and Saturation [V]), YIQ, and a number of others. An interesting aside: luminance is analogous to brightness of the video signal, whereas hue and saturation make up the chrominance (color) component.
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