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HDSL2 offers the same service that HDSL offers, with one added (and significant) advantage: it does so over a single pair of wire, rather than two. It also provides other advantages. First, it was designed to improve vendor interoperability by requiring less equipment at either end of the span (transceivers or repeaters). Second, it was designed to work within the confines of standard telephone company carrier serving area (CSA) guidelines by offering a 12,000-foot wire-run capability that matches the requirements of CSA deployment strategies. (See the discussion on CSA guidelines later in this section.) A number of companies have deployed T-1 access over HDSL2 at rates 40 percent lower than typical T-Carrier prices. Furthermore, a number of vendors including 3Com, Lucent, Nortel Networks, and Alcatel have announced their intent to work together to achieve interoperability among DSL modems.
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RADSL (pronounced rad-zel ) is a variation of ADSL designed to accommodate changing line conditions that can affect the overall performance of the circuit. Like ADSL, it relies on DMT encoding, which selectively populates subcarriers with transported data, thus allowing for granular rate-setting.
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VDSL is the newest DSL entrant in the bandwidth game and shows promise as a provider of extremely high levels of access bandwidth, as much as 52 Mbps over a short local loop. VDSL requires Fiber-to-theCurb (FTTC) architecture and recommends ATM as a switching protocol. From a fiber hub, copper tail circuits deliver the signal to the business or residential premises. The bandwidth available through VDSL ranges from 1.5 to 6 Mbps on the upstream side, and from 13 to 52 Mbps on the downstream side. Obviously, the service is distance-sensitive and the actual achievable bandwidth drops as a function of distance. Nevertheless, even a short loop is respectable when such high bandwidth levels can be achieved. With VDSL, 52 Mbps can be reached over a loop length of up to 1,000 feet, not an unreasonable distance by any means.
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Because the installation of splitters has proven to be a contentious and problematic issue, the need has arisen for a version of ADSL that does not require them. That version is known as either ADSL Lite or g.lite (after the ITU-T G-Series standards that govern much of the ADSL technology). In 1997, Microsoft, Compaq, and Intel created the Universal ADSL Working Group (UAWG),1 an organization that grew to nearly 50
The group self-dissolved in the summer of 1999 after completing what they believed their charter to be.
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members dedicated to the task of simplifying the rollout of ADSL. In effect, the organization had four stated goals:
To ensure that analog telephone service will work over the g.lite deployment without remote splitters, in spite of the fact that the quality of the voice may suffer slightly due to the potential for impedance mismatch. To maximize the length of deployed local loops by limiting the maximum bandwidth provided. Research indicates that customers are far more likely to notice a performance improvement when migrating from 64 Kbps to 1.5 Mbps than when going from 1.5 Mbps to higher speeds. Perception is clearly important in the marketplace, so the UADSL Working Group chose 1.5 Mbps as their downstream speed. To simplify the installation and use of ADSL technology by making the process as plug-and-play as possible. To reduce the cost of the service to a perceived reasonable level.
Of course, g.lite is not without its detractors. A number of vendors have pointed out that if g.lite requires the installation of microfilters at the premises on a regular basis, then true splitterless DSL is a myth, because microfilters are in effect a form of splitter. They contend that if the filters are required anyway, then they might as well be used in fullservice ADSL deployments to guarantee a high-quality service delivery. Unfortunately, this flies in the face of one of the key tenets of g.lite, which is to simplify and reduce the cost of DSL deployment by eliminating the need for an installation dispatch (a truck roll in the industry s parlance). The key to g.lite s success in the eyes of the implementers is to eliminate the dispatch, minimize the impact on traditional POTS telephones, reduce costs, and extend the achievable drop length. Unfortunately, customers still have to be burdened with the installation of microfilters, and coupled noise on POTS is higher than expected. Many vendors argue that these problems largely disappear with full-feature ADSL using splitters; a truck dispatch is still required, but again, it is often required to install the microfilters anyway, so there is no net loss. Furthermore, a number of major semiconductor manufacturers support both g.lite and ADSL on the same chipset, so the decision to migrate from one to the other is a simple one that does not necessarily involve a major replacement of internal electronics.
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