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Web surfing during which the bulk of the traffic travels in the downstream direction anyway. Although cable modems do speed up access to the Web and other online services by several orders of magnitude, a number of downsides must be considered. The greatest concern that has been voiced about cable modems is security. Because cable modems are always on, they represent an easy entry point for hackers looking to break into machines. It is therefore critical that cable subscribers use some form of firewall software or a router that has the capability to perform filtering.
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As interest grew in the late 1990s for broadband access to data services over cable television networks, CableLabs , working closely with the ITU and major hardware vendors, crafted a standard known as the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS). The standard is designed to ensure interoperability among cable modems as well as to assuage concerns about data security over shared cable systems. DOCSIS has done a great deal to resolve marketplace issues. Under the standards, CableLabs crafted a cable modem certification standard called DOCSIS 1.0 that guarantees that modems carrying the certification will interoperate with any head-end equipment, are ready to be sold in the retail market, and will interoperate with other certified cable modems. Engineers from Askey, Broadcom, Cisco Systems, Ericsson, General Instrument, Motorola, Philips, 3Com, Panasonic, Digital Furnace, Thomson, Terayon, Toshiba, and Com21 participated in the development effort. The DOCSIS 1.1 specification was released in April 1999 and included two additional functional descriptions that began to be implemented in 2000. The first specification details procedures for guaranteed bandwidth as well as a specification for Quality of Service (QoS) guarantees. The second specification is called Baseline Privacy Interface Plus (BPI ) and it enhances the current security capability of the DOCSIS standards through the addition of digital certificate-based authentication and support for multicast services to customers. Although the DOCSIS name is in widespread use, CableLabs now refers to the overall effort as the CableLabs Certified Cable Modem Project.
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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It is only in the last few years that wireless access technologies have advanced to the point that they are being taken seriously as contenders for the broadband local loop market. Traditionally, a minimal infrastructure was in place, and it was largely bandwidth-bound and error-prone to the point that wireless solutions were not considered serious contenders.
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To understand wireless communications, it is necessary to examine both radio and telephone technologies, because the two are inextricably intertwined. In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell, a part-time inventor and a teacher of hearing-impaired students, invented the telephone while attempting to resolve the challenge of transmitting multiple telegraph signals over a shared pair of wires. His invention changed the world forever. In 1896, a mere 20 years later, Italian engineer and inventor Guglielmo Marconi developed the spark gap radio transmitter, which eventually enabled him to transmit long-wave radio signals across the Atlantic Ocean as early as 1901. Like Bell, his invention changed the world; for his contributions, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1909. It wasn t until the 1920s, though, when these two technologies began to dovetail, that their true promise was realized. Telephony provided interpersonal, two-way, high-quality voice communications, but required the user to be stationary. Radio, on the other hand, provided mobile communications, but was limited by distance, environmentally induced signal degradation, and spectrum availability. Although telephony was advertised as a universally available service, radio was more of a catchas-catch-can offering that was subject to severe blocking. If a system could be developed that combined the signal quality and ubiquity of telephony with the mobility of radio, however, a truly promising new service offering could be made available. Today cellular telephony (and other services like it) provides highquality, almost ubiquitous, wireless telephone service. Thanks to advances in digital technology, wireless telephony also offers services identical to those provided by the wired network. Pricing for wired and wireless services is also now reaching parity; flat rate nationwide pricing models are commonplace today that have no roaming or long-distance restrictions.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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