progress bar code in vb.net Transport Technologies in Software

Creator EAN 13 in Software Transport Technologies

Transport Technologies
Scanning GS1 - 13 In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
EAN-13 Printer In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Software applications.
Transport Technologies
Decoding EAN-13 In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
GS1 - 13 Printer In Visual C#
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in .NET framework applications.
We begin our discussion with dedicated private line, otherwise known as point-to-point.
EAN / UCC - 13 Generator In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in ASP.NET applications.
EAN / UCC - 13 Drawer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in VS .NET applications.
Point-to-Point Technologies
EAN-13 Generator In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in .NET framework applications.
EAN 128 Generation In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Software applications.
Point-to-point technologies do exactly what their name implies: they connect one point directly with another. For example, it is common for two buildings in a downtown area to be connected by a point-to-point microwave or infrared circuit, because the cost of establishing it is far lower than the cost to put in physical facilities in a crowded city. Many businesses rely on dedicated, point-to-point optical facilities to interconnect locations, especially businesses that require dedicated bandwidth for high-speed applications. Of course, point-to-point does not necessarily imply high-bandwidth; many locations use 1.544-Mbps T-1 facilities for interconnection, and some rely on lower-speed circuits where higher bandwidth is not required. Dedicated facilities provide bandwidth from as low as 2,400 bps to as high as multiple gigabits per second. 2,400-bps analog facilities are not commonly seen but are often used for alarm circuits and telemetry, whereas circuits operating at 4,800 and 9,600 bps are used to access interactive, host-based data applications. Higher-speed facilities are usually digital and are often channelized by dedicated multiplexers and shared among a collection of users or by a variety of applications. For example, a high-bandwidth facility that interconnects two corporate locations might be dynamically subdivided into various-sized channels for use by a Private Branch Exchange (PBX) for voice, a videoconferencing system, and data traffic. Dedicated facilities have the advantage of always being available to the subscriber. However, they also have the disadvantage of being there and accumulating charges whether they are being used or not. For the longest time, dedicated circuits represented the only solution that provided guaranteed bandwidth; switched solutions simply weren t designed for the heavy service requirements of graphical and dataintensive traffic. Over time, however, that has changed. A number of switched solutions have emerged in the last few years that provide guaranteed bandwidth and only accumulate charges when they are being used (although some of them offer very reasonable fixed-rate service). The two most common of these are Frame Relay and ATM; we begin with Frame Relay.
EAN13 Maker In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
USS Code 128 Encoder In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code128 image in Software applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Encoding Code-39 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Software applications.
Data Matrix ECC200 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Software applications.
Transport Technologies
UCC - 14 Generator In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create EAN - 14 image in Software applications.
Creating GS1 RSS In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create DataBar image in VS .NET applications.
6
EAN13 Maker In .NET
Using Barcode creation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Reporting Service applications.
Barcode Printer In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Before we do, however, let s spend a few minutes discussing the hierarchy of switching. Part of this is a review of prior material. Most of it, though, is preparation for our discussion of Frame Relay and ATM, the so-called fast-packet switching technologies.
Encode UPC-A Supplement 5 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Android applications.
USS Code 39 Drawer In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in VS .NET applications.
The Switching Hierarchy
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Creator In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Java applications.
Bar Code Scanner In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
The switching hierarchy, shown in Figure 6-1, has two major subheadings: circuit switching and store-and-forward switching. Circuit switching is something of an evolutionary dead end in that it will not become something else. The only evolution for circuit switching is an evolution toward packet switching at this point. Packet switching evolved as one of the two descendents of store-andforward technology. Message switching, the alternative and another evolutionary dead end, is inefficient and not suited to the bursty nature of most data services today. Packet switching continues to hold sway and, because of its many forms, is a valid solution for most data applications. Packet switching has three major forms, two of which were discussed in earlier chapters. Connection-oriented packet switching manifests itself as a virtual circuit service that offers the appearance and behavior of a dedicated circuit when, in fact, it is a switched service. It creates a path through the network that all packets from the same source (and going to the same destination) follow, the result of which is constant transmission latency for all packets in the flow. Both
Figure 6-1 The switching hierarchy.
Circuit
Switching
Store & Forward
Packet
Message
Connection-Oriented
Connectionless
Fast
Virtual Circuit
Datagram
Cell
Frame
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.