progress bar code in vb.net Transport Technologies in Software

Painting EAN-13 Supplement 5 in Software Transport Technologies

Transport Technologies
EAN 13 Scanner In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
EAN / UCC - 13 Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
Transport Technologies
EAN 13 Decoder In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Encode UPC - 13 In C#
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in VS .NET applications.
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
GS1 - 13 Printer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in ASP.NET applications.
European Article Number 13 Generator In .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in .NET framework applications.
Network architectures often develop in concert with the corporate structures that they serve. Companies with centralized management authorities such as utilities, banks, and hospitals often have centralized and tightly controlled hierarchical data-processing architectures to protect their data. On the other hand, organizations that are distributed in nature such as research and development facilities and universities often have highly distributed data processing architectures. They tend to share information on a peer-to-peer basis and their corporate structures reflect the fact. ATM came about not only because of the proliferation of diverse network architectures, but also because of the evolution of traffic characteristics and transport requirements. To the well-known demands of voice, we now add various flavors of data, video, MP3, an exponentially large variety of IP traffic, interactive real-time gaming, and a variety of other content types that place increasing demands on the network. Further, we have seen a requirement arise for a mechanism that can transparently and correctly transport the mix of various traffic types over a single network infrastructure while at the same time delivering granular, controllable, and measurable QoS levels for each service type. In its original form, ATM was designed to do exactly that, working with SONET or the Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) to deliver highspeed transport and switching throughout the network in the wide area, the metropolitan area, the campus environment, and the LAN, right down to the desktop, seamlessly, accurately, and fast. Today, because of competition from such technologies as QoS-aware IP transport, proprietary high-speed mesh networks, and Fast and Gigabit Ethernet, ATM has for the most part lost the race to the desktop. ATM is a cell-based technology, which simply means that the fundamental unit of transport a frame of data, if you will is of a fixed size, which enables switch designers to build faster, simpler devices, because they can always count on their switched payload being the same size at all times. That cell comprises a 5-octet header and a 48-octet payload field, as shown in Figure 6-5. The payload contains user data and the header contains information that the network requires to both transport the payload correctly and ensure proper quality of service levels for the payload. ATM accomplishes this task well, but at a cost. The 5-octet header comprises nearly 10 percent of the cell, a rather significant price to pay,
GTIN - 13 Maker In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Creating Code 128 Code Set B In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Software applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Code-39 Generation In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
Paint Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
Transport Technologies
Encode GTIN - 13 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in Software applications.
Drawing Barcode In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
Figure 6-5 The ATM cell.
Create Planet In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create USPS PLANET Barcode image in Software applications.
Recognizing Bar Code In C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Header Payload
Creating Barcode In None
Using Barcode printer for Word Control to generate, create bar code image in Word applications.
Data Matrix Encoder In None
Using Barcode encoder for Online Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Online applications.
6
Bar Code Drawer In None
Using Barcode creation for Microsoft Word Control to generate, create barcode image in Office Word applications.
Creating Matrix Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
5 octets
Code 39 Full ASCII Printer In None
Using Barcode creation for Online Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Online applications.
Printing Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
48 octets
particularly when other technologies such as IP and SONET add their own significant percentages of overhead to the overall payload. This reality is part of the problem. ATM s original claims to fame, and the reasons it rocketed to the top of the technology hit parade, were its capability to switch cells at tremendous speeds through the fabric of the WAN and the ease with which the technology could be scaled to fit any network situation. Today, however, given the availability of high-speed IP routers that routinely route packets at terabit rates, ATM s advantages have begun to pale to a certain degree.
ATM Evolution
ATM has, however, emerged from the flames in other ways. Today many service providers see ATM as an ideal aggregation technology for diverse traffic streams that need to be combined for transport across a WAN that will most likely be IP-based. ATM devices then will be placed at the edge of the network, where they will collect traffic for transport across the Internet or (more likely) a privately owned IP network. Furthermore, because it has the capability to be something of a chameleon by delivering diverse services across a common network fabric, it is further guaranteed a seat at the technology game. It is interesting to note that the traditional, legacy telecommunications network comprises two principal regions that can be clearly distinguished from each other: the network itself, which provides switching, signaling, and transport for traffic generated by customer applications; and the access loop, which provides the connectivity between the customer s applications and the network. In this model, the network is considered to be a relatively intelligent medium, whereas the customer equipment is usually considered to be relatively stupid. Not only is the intelligence seen as being concentrated within the confines of the network, so too is the bulk of the bandwidth because the legacy model indicates that traditional customer applications don t require much of it. Between CO switches, however, and between the offices themselves, enormous bandwidth is required.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.