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exceptionally well for each device. This does not become a problem until it comes time to create a management hierarchy for a large network, shown in Figure 2-17, at which time the network management center begins to look a lot like a Macy s television department. (A large network management system is shown in Figure 2-18.) Each device or set of devices requires its own display monitor, and when one device in the network fails, causing a waterfall effect, the network manager must reconstruct the entire chain of events to discover what the original causative factor was. This is sometimes called the Three-Mile-Island effect. Back in the 1970s when the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant went critical and tried to make Pennsylvania glow in the dark, it became
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Figure 2-17 Network management hierarchy.
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Element
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Figure 2-18 Network management center (Courtesy of AT&T).
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Protocols
Protocols
clear to the Monday morning quarterbacks trying to reconstruct the event and create the how this could have been prevented document that all the information required to turn the critical failure of the reactor into a nonevent was in the control room, buried somewhere in the hundreds of pages of fanfold paper that came spewing out of the highspeed printers. No procedure was in place to receive the output from the many managed devices and processes involved in the complex task of managing a nuclear reactor, analyzing the output, and handing a simple, easy-to-respond-to decision to the operator. The same problem is true in complex networks. Most of them have hundreds of managed devices with simple associated element management systems that generate primitive data about the health and welfare of each device. The information from these element managers is delivered to the network management center, where it is displayed on one of many monitors that the network managers themselves use to track and respond to the status of the network. What they really need is a single map of the network that shows all of the managed devices in green if they are healthy. If a device begins to approach a preestablished threshold of performance, the icon on the map that represents that device turns yellow, and if it fails entirely, it turns red, yells loudly, and automatically reports and escalates the trouble. In one of his many books on American management practices, USC Professor Emeritus Warren Bennis observes that the business of the future will be run by a person and a dog. The person will be there to feed the dog; the dog will be there to make sure the person doesn t touch anything. Clearly, that model applies here. So how can this ideal model of network management be achieved Every vendor will tell you that their element management system is the best element manager ever created. None of them are willing to change the user interface that they have created so carefully. Using a canonical form, however, there is no reason to. All that has to be done is to exact an agreement from every vendor that stipulates that, although they do not have to change their user interface, they must agree to speak some form of technological Esperanto on the back side of their device. That way the users still get to use the interface they have grown accustomed to, but on the network side, every management system will talk to every other management system using a common and widely accepted form. Again, it s just like a canonical language. If people from five different language groups need to communicate, they have a choice. They can each learn everybody else s language (four additional
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