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Figure 3-9 Midland, Amarillo, and Roswell Railroad.
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Railroad. Rail yards in each of the three cities are interconnected by high-volume trunk lines. The train yards, also known as switch yards, are used as aggregation, storage, and switching facilities for the cargo that arrives on trains entering each yard. A 90-car train from El Paso, for example, may arrive in Midland as planned. Half the cars are destined for Midland, while the other half are destined for Amarillo. At the Midland yard the train is stored, disassembled, reassembled for transport, and switched as required to move the Amarillo traffic on to Amarillo. Switches in the yards (see Figure 3-10) create temporary paths from one side of the yard to the other. Meanwhile, route bosses in the yard towers analyze traffic patterns and route trains across a variety of alternative paths to ensure the most efficient delivery. For example, traffic from Amarillo to Roswell could be routed through Midland, but it would obviously be more efficient to send it on the direct line that runs between Amarillo and Roswell. Assuming that the direct route is available and is not congested, the route boss might very well choose that alternative. Notice also that short local lines, called feeder lines, pump local traffic into the switchyards. These lines typically run shorter trains destined most likely for local delivery. Some of them, however, carry cargo destined for distant cities. In those cases, the cargo would be combined with that of other trains to create a large, efficient train with all cargo bound for the same destination.
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Figure 3-10 A typical railroad switch.
Trunks, lines, feeders, local access spurs, switches, routers-all these terms are used commonly in the telecommunications industry. Trunks are high-bandwidth, long-distance transport facilities. Lines, feeders, and local access spurs are local loops. Switches and routers are, well, switches and routers. And the overall function of the two is exactly the same, as is their goal of delivering their transported payload in the most efficient fashion possible. When Bell s contraption first arrived on the scene, it wasn t a lot more complicated than a railroad, frankly. As we noted earlier, there was no initial concept of switching. Instead, the plan was to gradually evolve the network to a full mesh architecture as customers demanded more and more connections. Eventually, operators were added to provide a manual switching function of sorts, and over time they were replaced with, then electromechanical, then all-electronic switches. Ultimately, intelligence was overlaid in the form of signaling, giving the network the capability to make increasingly informed decisions about traffic handling and provide value-added services. Now that you understand the overall development strategy that Bell and his cohorts had in mind, as well as the basics of switching, we turn our attention to the inner workings of the typical network, shown in Figure 3-11. I must take a moment here to thank my good friend Dick Pecor, who created this drawing, from his head, I might add. Thanks, Dick. Scalpel, please.
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Figure 3-11 Typical network.
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MDF Williston CO TU IXC POP Charlotte CO
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When a customer makes a telephone call, a complex series of events takes place that ultimately leads to the creation of a temporary end-toend, service-rich path. Let s follow a typical phone call through the network. Cristina in Williston is going to call Adam in Charlotte. This is a high-level explanation; we ll add more detail later. When Cristina picks up the telephone in her home, the act of lifting the handset1 closes a circuit that enables a current to flow from the switch in the local central office that serves her neighborhood to her telephone. The switch electronically attaches an oscillator to the circuit called a dial tone generator, which creates the customary sound that we all listen for when we want to place a call. The dial tone serves to notify the caller that the switch is ready to receive the dialed digits. Cristina now dials Adam s telephone number by pressing the appropriate buttons on the phone. Each button generates a pair of tones (listen
1 It doesn t matter whether the phone is corded or cordless. If cordless, pushing the TALK button creates a radio link between the handset and the base station, which in turn closes the circuit.
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