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Interconnecting the components of the computer is a cable known as a parallel bus. It is called parallel because the bits that make up one or more 8-bit bytes travel down the bus beside each other on individual rather than one after the next as in a serial cable on a single conductor. Both are shown schematically in Figure 4-7. The advantage of a parallel bus is speed. By pumping multiple bits into a device in the computer simultaneously, the device, such as a CPU, can process them faster. Obviously, the more leads there are in the bus,
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Figure 4-7 Parallel and serial buses.
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the more bits can be transported. It should come as no surprise, then, that another differentiator of computers today is the width of the bus. A 32-bit bus is four times faster than an 8-bit bus. As long as the internal device to which the bus is transporting data has as many I/O leads as the bus, it can handle the higher volume of traffic. The parallel bus does not have to be a flexible gray cable; for those devices that are physically attached to the main printed circuit board (often called the motherboard), the parallel bus is extended as wire leads that are etched into the surface of the motherboard. Devices such as I/O cards attach to the board via edge connectors. Enough about computer internals. A brief word about computer history and evolution is now in order. The work performed by Von Neumann and his contemporaries led to the development of the modern mainframe computer (see Figure 4-8) in the 1960s and its many succeeding machine design generations. Targeted primarily at corporate applications, the mainframe continues to provide computing services required by most corporations: access to enormous databases, security, and support for hundreds of simultaneous users. These systems host enormous disk pools (see Figure 4-9) and tape libraries (see Figure 4-10) and are housed in totally self-contained windowless computer centers. Their components are interconnected by large cables that require that they be installed on raised floors (see Figure 4-11). They produce so much heat that they are fed enormous amounts of chilled air and water, and require constant attention and monitoring. It makes sense; these are very powerful creatures. Over time, computer technology advanced and soon a new need arose. Mainframes were fine for the computing requirements of large, homogeneous user communities, but as the technology became cheaper and more
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Figure 4-8 Mainframe computers in a clean room environment. No people work on this floor; the machines are controlled from another area.
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Figure 4-9 Mainframe disk pool, sometimes called a DASD (Direct Access Storage Device) Farm.
ubiquitous, the applications for which computers could be used became more diverse. Soon a need arose for smaller machines that could be used in more specialized departmental applications, and in the 1970s, thanks to companies like Xerox, Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), and Data General, the minicomputer was born (see Figure 4-12). The minicomputer made it possible for individual departments in a corporation or even small corporations to take charge of their own computer destinies and not be shackled to the centralized data centers of yore. It carried with it a price, of course. Not only did these companies or organizations lose their dependency on the data center, but they also lost the centralized support that came with it. So, this evolution had its downside.
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