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Figure 5-11 Raised floor, showing cables below
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Figure 5-12 Minicomputers
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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January 1975 with the announcement of the MITS ALTAIR (Figure 513). Built by Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the ALTAIR was designed around the Intel 8080 microprocessor and a specially designed 100-pin connector. The machine ran a BASIC operating system developed by Bill Gates and Paul Allen; in effect, MITS was Microsoft s first customer. The ALTAIR was really a hobbyist s machine, but soon the market shifted to a small business focus. Machines like the Apple, Osborne, and Kaypro were smaller and offered integrated keyboards and video displays. In 1981, of course, IBM entered the market with the DOS-based personal PC, and soon the world was a very different place. Apple followed with the Macintosh and the first commercially available graphical user interface (GUI), and the rest, as they say, is history. Soon corporations embraced the PC; a chicken in every pot, a computer on every desk seemed to be the rallying cry for IT departments everywhere. There was a downside to this evolution, of course. The arrival of the PC heralded the arrival of a new era in computing that allowed every individual to have his own applications, her own file structures, and his own data. The good news was that each person now controlled his or her own individual computer resources; the bad news was that each person now controlled his or her own individual computer resources. Suddenly the control was gone: Instead of having a copy of the database, there were now as many copies as there were users. This led to huge problems. Furthermore, PC proliferation led to another challenge: connectivity, or lack of it. Whereas before every user had electronic access to every other user
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Figure 5-13 The ALTAIR 8800 computer (Photo courtesy Jim Willing, The Computer Garage)
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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via the mainframe or minicomputer-based network that hooked everyone together, the PC did not have that advantage. Furthermore, PCs eliminated the efficiency with which expensive network resources such as printers could be shared. Some of you may remember the days when being the person in the office with The Laser Printer attached to your machine was akin to approaching a state of Nirvana. You were able to do your work and print anytime you wanted except, of course, for the disruption caused by all of those people standing behind you with floppy disks in their hands promising you that It s only one page it ll just take a second. Thus was born the term Sneakernet; in order to print something, you had to put the document on a diskette (probably a 51/4inch floppy, back when floppies really were floppy), walk over to the machine with the directly attached printer, and beg and wheedle for permission to print the file not the most efficient technique for sharing a printer. Something else was needed. That something was the local area network (LAN).
LAN Basics
A LAN is exactly what the name implies: A physically small network, typically characterized by high-speed transport, low error rate, and private ownership, which serves the data transport needs of a geographically small community of users. Most LANs provide connectivity, resource sharing, and transport services within a single building, although they can operate within the confines of multiple buildings on a campus. When LANs were first created, the idea was to design a network option that would provide a low-cost solution for transport. Up until their arrival, the only transport option available was dedicated private line from the telephone company or X.25 packet switching. Both were expensive, and X.25 was less reliable than was desired. Furthermore, the devices being connected together were relatively low-cost devices; it simply didn t make sense to interconnect them with expensive network resources. That would defeat the purpose of the LAN concept. All LANs, regardless of the access mechanism, share certain characteristics. They all rely on some form of transmission medium that is shared among all the users on the LAN; all use some kind of interrupt and contention protocol to ensure that all devices get an equal opportu-
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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