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Figure 5-19 A collision on a contentionbased LAN
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because there is no upward limit on how much delay a station can incur as it waits to use the shared medium. As the LAN gets busier and traffic increases, the number of stations vying for access to the shared medium which only allows a single station at a time to use it, by the way also goes up, which naturally results in more collisions. Collisions translate into wasted bandwidth, so LANs do everything they can to avoid them. We will discuss techniques for this in the contention world a bit later in this chapter. The protocol that contention-based LANs employ is called carrier sense, multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD). In CSMA/CD, a station observes the following guidelines when attempting to use the shared network. First, it listens to the shared medium to determine whether it is in use or not that s the carrier sense part of the name. If the LAN is available (not in use), it begins to transmit, but continues to listen while it is transmitting, knowing that another station could also choose to transmit at the same time that s the multiple access part. In the event that a collision is detected, usually indicated by a dramatic increase in the signal power measured on the shared LAN, both stations back off and try again. That s the collision detection part. Ethernet is the most common example of a CSMA/CD LAN. Originally released as a 10 Mbps product based on IEEE standard 802.3, Ethernet rapidly became the most widely deployed LAN technology in the world.
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As bandwidth-hungry applications such as E-Commerce, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), and Web access evolved, transport technologies advanced, and bandwidth availability (and capability) grew, 10 Mbps Ethernet began to show its age. Today, new versions of Ethernet have emerged that offer 100 Mbps (Fast Ethernet) and 1,000 Mbps (Gigabit Ethernet) transport, with plans afoot for even faster versions. Furthermore, in keeping with the demands being placed on LANs by convergence, standards are evolving for LAN-based voice transport mechanisms that guarantee quality of service for mixed traffic types. Gigabit Ethernet has become a fundamentally important technology as its popularity and level of deployment have climbed. Emerging applications certainly make the case for Gigabit Ethernet s bandwidth capability: LAN telephony, server interconnection, and video to the desktop all demand low-latency solutions, and Gigabit Ethernet may be positioned to provide it. Many vendors have entered the marketplace including Alcatel, Lucent Technologies, Nortel Networks, and Cisco Systems. The other aspect of the LAN environment that began to show weaknesses was the overall topology of the network itself. LANs are broadcast environments, which means that when a station transmits, every station on the LAN segment hears the message (Figure 5-20). While this is a simple implementation scheme, it is also wasteful of bandwidth, since stations hear broadcasts that they have no reason to hear. In response to this, a technological evolution occurred. It was obvious to LAN implementers that the traffic on most LANs was somewhat domain-oriented; that is, it tended to cluster into communities of interest based on the work groups using the LAN. For example, if employees in sales shared a LAN with shipping and order processing, three discernible traffic groupings emerged, according to what network architects call The 80:20 Rule. The 80:20 Rule simply states that 80 percent of the traffic that originates in a particular work group tends to stay in that work group, an observation that makes network design distinctly simpler. If the traffic naturally tends to segregate itself into groupings, then the topology of the network could change to reflect those groupings. Thus was born the bridge. Bridges are devices with two responsibilities: They filter traffic that does not have to propagate in the forward direction, and they forward traffic that does. For example, if the network described previously were to have a bridge inserted in it (Figure 5-21), all of the employees in each of the three work groups would share a LAN segment, and each segment would be attached to a port on the bridge. When an employee in sales transmits a message to another employee in sales, the bridge is
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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