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Finally, cognitive radio allows application developers to create applications that are platform independent and that can be augmented easily through dynamic application of features, patches, and capabilities. Cognitive radio applications span multiple wireless devices including mobile phones, smart phones, PDAs, and computing devices. Today s digital cellular networks use a variety of technologies for the air interface and support multiple data standards. To add to the complexity, the wireless industry is introducing GPS, Bluetooth, and a variety of equally disruptive protocols to the mix. Cognitive radio offers a solution to accommodate this plethora of standards, frequency bands, and applications by offering end-user devices that can be programmed using overthe-air software. With cognitive radio, a service provider will implement a common hardware platform and accommodate the interworking of all these standards and technologies via instantly downloadable software modules and firmware.
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Radio frequency identification (RFID) has its origins in the 1940s, when the fundamental technology that underlies modern RFID systems was developed to discriminate between inbound friendly aircraft and inbound enemy aircraft. Allied aircraft carried transponders that broadcast a unique radio signal when interrogated by radar, identifying them as a friendly. This Identify: Friend or Foe (IFF) system was the basis for the development of the technology set we refer to today as RFID. Modern aircraft still use transponders to automatically and uniquely identify themselves to ground controllers (the well-known squawk function). Many believe that RFID is an extension of the common barcode and, while the two share some application overlap, RFID is much more than a barcode.
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A typical RFID system is a remarkably simple collection of technology components. It comprises a collection of transponder tags, which form the heart of the system; a reader, which energizes the tags, collects information from them, and delivers the information to backroom
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Figure 6-12 RFID transponder
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analysis applications; and the application set that analyzes the data provided by the transponder tags to the reader. This application set is critically important, because RFID systems, by their very design, generate enormous amounts of data that must be analyzed and acted upon if the system is to have value. Each transponder, an example of which is shown in Figure 6-12, has a unique serial number (a card ID, or CID) that identifies the tag and therefore whatever it is attached to a pallet of products, an identification card, or a beef cow in a herd. When the tag is within the operational range of a reader, the reader s magnetic field energizes the tag, causing it to go through a series of functions that culminate in the transmission of whatever piece of data is stored in the tag s memory. This information is programmable and might contain detailed product information, product perishability data, routing information, a sheep s bloodline, and so on. For the most part, the tags are passive, meaning that they have no battery but are, in fact, powered inductively by the RF signal emitted by the reader. These tags necessarily have a relatively short read range as much as a foot, no more but active tags, which do have internal power, can broadcast up to 20 feet under the right conditions. Passive tags are often used in applications where proximity to a reader is assured, such as in a warehouse or transportation-based supply chain environment. Active devices are commonly seen in such applications as automated tolltaking systems on major freeways. The EZ-Pass system deployed in the northeastern United States is a good example.
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