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An Aside: Mobility vs. Ubiquity
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As a telecom industry analyst and author of numerous books about the business and technology sides of the telecom marketplace, I tend to focus on the words used by the people and companies that comprise the industry, because the careless use of those words often leads to misinterpretation, which in turn leads to inappropriate investment and infrastructure decisions. To that end, I realized recently that two important words in our technology lexicon are used synonymously. The words mobility and ubiquity are not synonyms. However, applications, network designs, investment decisions, strategic planning efforts, and end-user device engineering are being done as if they were one and the same. At worst, this will lead to another spate of ill-placed investments and the requisite marketplace blowback; at best it will lead to confusion and the resulting slowdown of effective deployment. Hopefully, the former won t occur; the latter already has. So before this gets too far down a dead-end road, let me clarify the difference between the two, beginning with definitions. According to the American Heritage Dictionary, mobility means the quality or state of being mobile, while ubiquity is defined as existence or apparent existence everywhere at the same time. From a communications perspective, mobility means being able to move freely while staying connected, as when engaging in the increasingly socially unacceptable practice of using a cell phone while driving. Ubiquity, on the other hand, means universal connectivity; that is, the ability to count on the presence of a connection of one kind or another from the bottom of the Grand Canyon to the top of Mount McKinley and everywhere in between. From a development point-of-view, these two concepts are being used interchangeably, creating confusion and developmental paralysis. Consider, for example, Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi is a high-speed wireless technology that provides 11 Mbps (or more or less) of access bandwidth to roaming laptops and PDAs. Its installation in restaurants and coffee shops by the likes of McDonald s and Starbucks is being advertised as a great step forward in mobility. But this isn t mobility: People aren t walking around Starbucks with a Venti Latte in one hand and a laptop in the other, surfing for MP3s. In fact, they are sitting in a booth or at a table enjoying the merits of ubiquitous access. Yes, the connection happens to be wireless, and these people are not in their homes or offices, but the presence of WiFi in this case is not an addition to the pantheon of mobility applications. It is, however, an application of ubiquitous connectivity. So, in this par-
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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ticular situation, what value does the wireless loop add It seems to me that Starbucks, McDonald s, and others could provide equal or better service to their customers who have a need to be connected by providing an RJ-45 cable or two at each table. It would be cheaper, more secure, and better in terms of service quality. Yet, there is a perceived sexiness associated with wireless that somehow precludes wired connectivity as an access option in ad hoc situations. Wi-Fi, of course, provides a convenience factor that clearly has value to the user, however intangible that value may be. Being able to connect anywhere in the coffee shop without being physically tethered is an advantage, but how much of an advantage is it Bluetooth, an alternative wireless technology, promised to eliminate dependence on wires between computer peripherals; yet, it remains a largely stillborn solution. Does it work Yes. Does it provide a level of value that overcomes the price Apparently not, because its usage levels are near zero. Consider the following scenario: McDonald s, Starbucks, Barnes & Noble, Borders, major airports, and large department stores all purchase DSL lines. They terminate the lines on a low-cost router, which in turn connects to a multiport hub. They then install convenient RJ-45 connections at each table or at some easily recognized spot in the store. Laptop users can either provide their own cable or borrow/purchase one from the host store. The service is offered at no cost and provides differentiation for the business, or is available via subscription in much the same way that T-Mobile and Wayport already offer connectivity in hotels and airports. Note that the connectivity technology is wired, and while the businesses listed could also add a wireless access point to their network, providing connectivity for Wi-Fi users, they still offer near-ubiquitous connectivity using a wired option. There is another issue that seems to have been lost in this discussion and that s the issue of power. Wireless connectivity sucks the life out of laptop batteries at a dizzying rate, which means that even with a wireless network loop a user will need a wired power loop in short order. In other words, they will have to be tethered anyway if they use the connection for more than ten or fifteen minutes, and this negates the sexiness of the wireless connection to a large extent. So what is the point of this discussion Both mobility and ubiquity are important in the emerging world of network usage, but they are not necessarily the same. Mobility implies the ability to connect to the network via a wireless local loop. Ideally it offers predictable high-bandwidth, easy, dependable connections, and secure transmission. Ubiquity, on the other hand, implies the ability to connect to the network anywhere,
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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