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find that each time a layer invokes a particular protocol, it wraps the user s data in an envelope of overhead information that tells the receiving device about the protocol used. For example, if a layer uses a particular compression technique to reduce the size of a transmitted file and a specific encryption algorithm to disguise the contents of the file, then it is important that the receiving device be made aware of the techniques employed so that it knows how to decompress and decrypt the file when it receives it. Needless to say, quite a bit of overhead must be transmitted with each piece of user data. The overhead is needed, however, if the transmission is to work properly. So, as the user s data passes down the so-called stack from layer to layer, additional information is added at each step of the way, as illustrated by the series of envelopes. In summary then, the message to be transported is handed to layer seven, which performs Application Layer functions and then attaches a header to the beginning of the message that explains the functions performed by that layer so that the receiver can interpret the message correctly. In our illustration, that header function is represented by information written on the envelope at each layer. When the receiving device is finally handed the message at the Physical Layer, each succeeding layer must open its own envelope until the kernel the message is exposed for the receiving application. Thus, OSI protocols really do work like a nested Russian doll. After peeling back layer after layer of the network onion, the core message is exposed. Let s now go back to our e-mail example, but this time we ll describe it within the detailed context of OSI s layered architecture. We begin with a lesson on linguistics.
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There is an old and somewhat comforting clich , which observes, Wherever one goes, people speak English. In fact, less than ten percent of the world s population speaks English and, to their credit, many of them speak it as a second language.1 Many believe there is a real need for a
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There is an old joke among seasoned international travelers that goes likes this: What do you call someone who speaks three languages Trilingual. OK, what do you call someone who speaks two languages Bilingual. OK, what do you call someone who speaks one language American.
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truly international language. In 1887, Polish physician Ludwig L. Zamenhof published a paper on the need for a universally spoken tongue. He believed that most of the world s international diplomacy disputes resulted from a communication failure between monolingual speakers and the inevitable misunderstandings of nuance that occur when one language is translated into another. Zamenhof set out to solve this Tower of Babel problem (origin of the word babble, by the way), resulting in the creation of the international language called Esperanto. In Esperanto, the word Esperanto means one who hopes. Since its creation, Esperanto has been learned by millions and, believe it or not, is widely spoken current estimates are approximately two million speakers. And its use is far from being purely academic: Meetings are held in Esperanto, advertising campaigns use it, hotels and restaurants publish literature using it, and professional communities such as health care and scientific research now use Esperanto widely as a way to universally communicate information. Second only to English, it is the lingua franca of the international world. It is most commonly spoken in Central and Eastern Europe, East Asia (particularly mainland China), South America, and Southwest Asia. It is less commonly spoken in North America, Africa, and the Middle East. Esperanto s success as the language of international communication results from three advantages. It is easy to learn; it is politically neutral; and, there are practical reasons to learn it. The structure of the language is so simple and straightforward that it can typically be learned in less than a quarter of the time it takes to learn a traditional language. For example, all letters have one sound and one sound only. There are only 16 grammar rules to learn, compared to the hundreds that pervade English and other Romance or Germanic languages. Furthermore, there are no irregular verb forms (you have to love that!). Even the vocabulary is simple to learn; many words are instantly recognizable (and learnable), such as these:
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Telefono (telephone) Biciclo (bicycle) Masxino (machine) Reto (network) Kosmo (outer space) Plano (plan)
Speakers of languages other than English will recognize the roots of these words; Reto, for example, is similar to the Spanish word red
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