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Protocols
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640 307,200 pixels 7,372,800 bits 480 307,200 pixels 7,372,800 bits
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24 bits/pixel 8 bits per byte
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921,600 bytes per image
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In other words, an uncompressed, relatively low quality image requires one megabyte of storage. A larger 1,024 by 768 pixel image requires 6.3 MB of storage capacity in its uncompressed form. Given
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Figure 2-17 The red, green, and blue (RGB) components of a pixel
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Blue
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Green
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Figure 2-18 Red, green, and blue light, shining on the same place, create white light.
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Green Red Blue
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Figure 2-19 Complementary colors
Yellow Red Magenta Blue Green
2
Combinations of Light Red+ Blue=Magenta Blue+Green=Cyan Green+Red=Yellow Red + Green+Blue=White! Any Two Complementary Colors = White
Cyan
Table 2-2 Primary and complementary color combinations
If you combine: Red Green Blue Red Blue Red Green Green Blue
The result is: Magenta Yellow Cyan White White
Any Two Complementary Colors
today s relatively low bandwidth access solutions (ISDN, DSL, cable modems, wireless), we should be thankful that compression technologies exist to reduce the bandwidth required to move them through a network!
Image Coding Schemes
Images are encoded using a variety of techniques. These include Windows Bitmap (BMP), JPEG, the Graphical Interchange Format (GIF), and the Tag Image File Format (TIFF). They are described in detail in the following sections.
Windows Bitmap (BMP)
Windows bitmap files are stored in a device-independent bitmap format that allows the Windows operating system to display the image on any type of display device. The phrase device independent means that the
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bitmap specifies pixel color in a format that is independent of the method used by a display device to represent color. The default filename extension of a Windows file is .BMP.
The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG)
As we mentioned earlier, JPEG is a standard designed to control image compression. The acronym stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group, the original name of the international body that created the standard. Made up of both technologists and artists, the JPEG committee created a highly complete and flexible standard that compresses both full-color and gray-scale images. It is effective when used with photographs, artwork, and medical images, and works less effectively on text and line drawings. JPEG is designed for the compression of still images, although there is a related standard (still in draft at the time of this writing) called Motion JPEG 2000 (MJP2). MJP2 is not really a formal standard, although various vendors and developers have tried to formalize it; MPEG, discussed later, is designed for the compression of moving images such as multimedia, movies, and real-time diagnostic images. However, according to the MJP2 committee, MJP2 will be the compression technology of choice for medical imaging, security systems, and digital cameras. JPEG is considered to be a lossy solution, meaning that once the original image has been compressed, the decompressed image loses a slight degree of integrity when it is viewed. There are, of course, lossless compression algorithms; JPEG, however, achieves more efficient compression than is possible with competing lossless techniques. On first blush this would appear to be a problem for many applications, since the compression process actually squeezes information out of the original image, leaving a slightly inferior artifact. For example, a diagnostician examining a medical image might be concerned with the fact that the compressed image is not as good as the original. Luckily, this is not a problem for one very simple reason: The human eye is an imperfect viewing device. JPEG is designed to take advantage of well-understood limitations in the human eye, particularly the fact that small color changes are not perceived as discretely as small brightness changes. Clearly, JPEG is designed to compress images that will be viewed by people and, therefore, do not have to be absolutely faithful reproductions of the original image from which they were created. A machine analysis of a JPEG
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