progress bar code in vb.net 2008 Voice Digitization in Software

Draw ANSI/AIM Code 39 in Software Voice Digitization

Voice Digitization
Code 39 Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Draw USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Code39 image in Software applications.
The goal of digitizing the human voice for transport across an all-digital network grew out of work performed at Bell Laboratories shortly after the turn of the century. That work led to a discrete understanding of not only the biological nature and spectral makeup of the human voice, but also to a better understanding of language, sound patterns, and the sounded emphases that make up spoken language.
Code39 Reader In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
USS Code 39 Encoder In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create Code39 image in .NET framework applications.
The Nature of Voice
Drawing Code 3/9 In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in ASP.NET applications.
Paint Code 3/9 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
A typical voice signal is made up of frequencies that range from approximately 30 Hz to 10 KHz. Most of the speech energy, however, lies between 300 Hz and 3,300 Hz, the so-called voice band. Experiments
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Generator In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in VS .NET applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Generation In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 128C image in Software applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
DataMatrix Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
Code 3 Of 9 Maker In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Software applications.
Telephony
UPC A Maker In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create UPC Code image in Software applications.
Paint Barcode In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Telephony
MSI Plessey Creation In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Software applications.
Draw Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode generator for Office Word Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Microsoft Word applications.
have shown that the frequencies below 1 KHz provide the bulk of recognizability and intelligibility, while the higher frequencies provide richness, articulation, and natural sound to the transmitted signal. The human voice has a remarkably rich mix of frequencies, and this richness comes at a considerable price. In order for telephone networks to transmit the voice s entire spectrum of frequencies, significant network bandwidth must be made available to every ongoing conversation. There is a substantial price tag attached to bandwidth; it is a finite commodity within the network, and the more of it that is consumed, the more it costs.
Barcode Printer In Java
Using Barcode drawer for BIRT Control to generate, create barcode image in BIRT reports applications.
Barcode Creator In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create bar code image in Android applications.
The Network
Making UCC.EAN - 128 In Java
Using Barcode creator for Android Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Android applications.
Painting Data Matrix In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Thankfully, work performed at Bell Laboratories at the beginning of the twentieth century helped network designers confront this challenge head-on. To understand it, let s take a tour of the telephone network. The typical network, as shown in Figure 3-62, is divided into several regions: the access plant; the switching, multiplexing, and circuit connectivity equipment (the central office); and the long-distance transport plant. The access and transport domains are often referred to as the outside plant; the central office is, conversely, the inside plant. The outside plant has the responsibility to aggregate inbound traffic for switching and transport across the long haul, as well as to terminate traffic at a
ECC200 Creator In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPhone applications.
Recognizing EAN13 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
Figure 3-62 Network regions
Access Plant
Transport Plant
Access
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Telephony
3
particular destination. The inside plant, on the other hand, has the responsibility to multiplex incoming traffic streams, switch the streams, and select an outbound path for ultimate delivery to the next central office in the chain or the final destination. Switching, therefore, was centrally important to the development of the modern network.
Multiplexing
Equally important as the development of the central office switch was the concept of multiplexing, which allowed multiple conversations to be carried simultaneously across a single shared physical circuit. The first such systems used frequency-division multiplexing (FDM), a technique made possible by the development of the vacuum tube, in which the range of available frequencies is divided into chunks which are then parceled out to subscribers. For example, Figure 3-63 illustrates that subscriber #1 might be assigned the range of frequencies between 0 and 4,000 Hz, while subscriber #2 is assigned 4,000 to 8,000 Hz, #3 8,000 to 12,000 Hz, and so on, up to the maximum range of frequencies available in the channelized system. In FDM, we often observe that users are given some of the frequency all of the time, meaning that they are free to use their assigned frequency allocation at any time, but may not step outside the bounds given to them. Early FDM systems were capable of transporting 24, 4 KHz channels, for an overall system bandwidth of 96 KHz. FDM, while largely replaced today by
Figure 3-63 Frequencydivision multiplexing (FDM)
Subscriber 1: 0 4,000 Hz Subscriber 2: 4,000 8,000 Hz Subscriber 3: 8,000 12,000 Hz Subscriber 4: 12,000 16,000 Hz Subscriber 5: 16,000 20,000 Hz
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.