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This book assumes that you have a solid grounding in the fundamentals of the Java language. You should be able to create, compile, and run Java programs. You should be able to use the most common parts of the Java API, handle exceptions, and create a multihreaded program. Thus, this book assumes that you have the skills that one would acquire in a first course on Java. If you need to refresh or enhance your basic knowledge, I recommend the following books: Java 2: A Beginner s Guide Java 2: The Complete Reference Both are published by McGraw-Hill/Osborne.
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A Team Effort
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I have been writing about programming for many years now and I seldom work with a coauthor. However, this book is a bit of an exception. Because of a rather unexpected but happy turn of events, I was able to team up with one of the brightest new talents in computing: James Holmes. James is an outstanding programmer with several impressive accomplishments, including being Oracle s Java Developer of the Year, and being a Committer for the Jarkarta Struts project. Because of James unique knowledge of Web-based programming, I thought that it would be great if he could contribute several chapters to this book fortunately, I was able to convince him to do so. As a result, James wrote chapters 4, 5, 6, and 7, which contain the most Internet-intensive applications. His contributions added greatly to the success of this project. James is now working on an in-depth book about Struts called Struts: The Complete Reference, which will be available by the end of 2003.
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Don t Forget: Code on the Web
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Remember, the source code for all of the examples and projects in this book is available free of charge on the Web at www.osborne.com.
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Preface
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The Art of Java is just one in a series of Herb Schildt programming books. Here are some others that you will find of interest. To learn more about Java programming, we recommend the following: Java 2: The Complete Reference Java 2: A Beginner s Guide Java 2: Programmer s Reference To learn about C++, you will find these books especially helpful: C++: The Complete Reference C++: A Beginner s Guide Teach Yourself C++ C++ From the Ground Up STL Programming From the Ground Up To learn about C#, we suggest the following books: C#: A Beginner s Guide C#: The Complete Reference If you want to learn more about the C language, the foundation of all modern programming, then the following titles will be of interest: C: The Complete Reference Teach Yourself C
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To learn about Struts, the open-source framework for Web development, we recommend the following book by James Holmes: Struts: The Complete Reference
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CHAPTER
The Genius of Java
By Herb Schildt and James Holmes
The Art of Java
istory in the large view is mirrored on a smaller scale by the history of programming. Just as the first societies sprang from simple beginnings, so too did programming. Just as great civilizations rose, flourished, and declined, so too have programming languages. Yet, throughout the rise and fall of nations, mankind progressed. In similar fashion, as each new language replaced its predecessor, the ongoing refinement of programming proceeded. Throughout history, there have been pivotal events, such as the fall of the Roman Empire, the invasion of Britain in 1066, or the first nuclear explosion, which transformed the world. The same is true for programming languages, albeit on a smaller scale. For example, the invention of FORTRAN changed forever the way that computers would be programmed. Another such pivotal event was the creation of Java. Java is the milestone that marks the beginning of programming s Internet age. Designed expressly for creating applications that would run anywhere there was an Internet connection, Java s write once, run anywhere philosophy defined the new programming paradigm. What Gosling, et al., initially saw as the solution to a relatively small class of problems became a force that defined the programming landscape for the next generation of programmers. Java so fundamentally altered how we thought about programming that the history of computer languages can be divided into two eras: Before Java and After Java. Programmers in the Before Java world created programs that ran on a stand-alone machine. Programmers in the After Java world create programs for a highly distributed, networked environment. No longer does a programmer think in terms of a single computer. Instead, the network is the computer and today we programmers think in terms of servers, clients, and hosts. Although the development of Java was driven by the needs of the Internet, Java is not simply an Internet language. Rather, it is a full-featured, general-purpose programming language designed for the modern, networked world. This means that Java is suitable for nearly all types of programming. Although sometimes overshadowed by its networking capabilities, Java also incorporated many innovative features that advanced the art of programming. These innovations still ripple through computing today. For example, several aspects of C# are modeled on elements first mainstreamed by Java. Throughout this book we will demonstrate the wide-ranging capabilities of Java by applying it to a varied cross section of applications. Some of the applications demonstrate the power of the language, independent of its networking attributes. We call these pure code examples because they show the expressiveness of the Java syntax and design philosophy. Others illustrate the ease with which sophisticated networked programs can be developed using the Java language and its API classes. Collectively, the applications show the power and scope of Java. Before we begin our exploration of Java, we will take some time in this first chapter to point out several of the features that make it a remarkable programming language. These are features that reflect what we call the genius of Java.
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