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resetStandardUserDefaults
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It would be simple enough to modify the previous preferences example to use
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NSUserDefaults. First, you d change the init method to create a shared defaults object and then read from it when creating the settingListing array, as shown in
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listing 8.2.
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Listing 8.2 Preferences setup with NSUserDefaults
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NSUserDefaults *myDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults]; settingsList = [NSArray arrayWithObjects: [NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys: @"Sounds",@"titleValue", @"switch",@"accessoryValue", [NSNumber numberWithBool:[myDefaults boolForKey:@"soundsValue"]],@"prefValue", @"setSounds:",@"targetValue",nil], [NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys: @"Music",@"titleValue", @"switch",@"accessoryValue", [NSNumber numberWithBool:[myDefaults boolForKey:@"musicValue"]],@"prefValue", @"setMusic:",@"targetValue",nil],nil];
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Extracts/sets sound value
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Extracts/sets music value
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The lines in which the prefValues are set are the new material here. The information is extracted from the NSUSerDefaults first. The methods called when each of these switches are moved can set and save changes to the default values. You ll want to do other things here too, but the abbreviated form of these methods is shown in listing 8.3.
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Maintaining user preferences
Listing 8.3
Setting and saving NSUserDefaults
-(void)setMusic:(id)sender { NSUserDefaults *myDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults]; UISwitch *musicSwitch = [switchList objectAtIndex:1]; [myDefaults setBool:musicSwitch.on forKey:@"musicValue"]; [NSUserDefaults resetStandardUserDefaults]; } -(void)setSounds:(id)sender { NSUserDefaults *myDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults]; UISwitch *soundsSwitch = [switchList objectAtIndex:0]; [myDefaults setBool:soundsSwitch.on forKey:@"soundsValue"]; [NSUserDefaults resetStandardUserDefaults]; }
This functionality is simple. You call up the NSUserDefaults, set any values you want to change, and then save them. If you call up your program again, you ll find that the two switches remain in the position that you set them the last time you ran the program. After you decide how to save your personal preferences, you ll have a skeleton for creating your own preferences page; and if that s appropriate for your program, you re finished. But that s just one of two ways to let users add preference data to your program. More commonly, you ll export your settings to the main Settings program. So, how do you do that
Using the system settings
When you created a personal preferences page in the previous section, you used all the SDK programming skills you ve been learning to date, creating objects and manipulating them. Conversely, using the system settings is much easier: it just requires creating some files.
About bundles
Xcode allows you to tie multiple files together into a coherent whole called a bundle. In practice, a bundle is just a directory. Often a bundle is made opaque, so that users can t casually see its contents; in this case, it s called a package. The main advantage of a bundle is that it can invisibly store multiple variants of a file, using the right one when the circumstances are appropriate. For example, an application bundle can include executable files for different chip architectures or in different formats. When working with Xcode, you re likely to encounter three different types of bundles: framework bundles, application bundles, and settings bundles. All frameworks appear packaged as framework bundles, although that s largely invisible to you. An application bundle is what s created when you compile a program to run on your iPhone or iPad; we ll talk about how to access individual files in a bundle in the next section, when we talk about files in general. Finally, the settings bundle contains a variety of information about system settings, a topic that we ll address now. You can find more information about how to access bundles in the NSBundle and CFBundle classes.
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Data: actions, preferences, and files
To begin using the system settings, you must create a settings bundle. You do this in Xcode by choosing the File > New File option. To date, you ve only created new files using the Cocoa Touch Classes option (starting in section 3.3). Now, you should instead choose Resources in the sidebar, which gives you the option to create one sort of settings file: Settings Bundle. When you do this, Settings.bundle is added to your current project.
EDITING EXISTING SETTINGS
Root.plist is an XML file; but as usual, you can view it in Xcode, where it appears as a list of keys and values. All of your settings appear under the PreferenceSpecifiers category, as shown in figure 8.2. You can enter seven types of data in the Settings plist file, each of which creates a specific tool on the Settings page. Of these, four appear by default in the plist file at the time of this writing and are the easiest to modify. All seven options are shown in table 8.3. The plist editor is simple to use and lets you easily do the vast majority of work required to create the settings for your program. You can cut and paste the existing four preferences (noted by checkmarks in table 8.3) to reorder them or create new instances of the four existing preference types. Then, you fill in their data to create preferences that look exactly like you want them.
Figure 8.2 This look at system settings reveals some of Root.plist s PreferenceSpecifiers in the lower-right pane.
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