barcode printing in vb.net Copyright 2005 by Bill Phillips. Click here for terms of use. in .NET framework

Draw Quick Response Code in .NET framework Copyright 2005 by Bill Phillips. Click here for terms of use.

Copyright 2005 by Bill Phillips. Click here for terms of use.
Recognize QR Code In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for .NET Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Draw QR-Code In .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR image in VS .NET applications.
One
Decode QR Code In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Generate Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
the tumbler edge of the door there was a hole accessible from outside the door that was large enough for someone to insert the key and an arm. The spoonshaped key was about 14 inches to 2 feet long with pegs sticking out of one end. After the key was inserted in the keyhole (or armhole ), it was pushed into the hollowed out part of the crossbeam until its pegs were aligned with their corresponding tumblers. The right key allowed all the tumblers to be lifted into a position between the crossbeam and vertical beam so that the pins no longer obstructed movement of the crossbeam. Then the crossbeam (bolt) could be pulled into the open position. To see how the lock looked and operated see Fig. 1.1. Greece Most early Greek doors pivoted at the center and were secured with rope tied in intricate knots. The cleverly tied knots, along with beliefs about being cursed for tampering with them, provided some security. When more security was needed, doors were secured by bolts from the inside. In the few cases where locks were used, they were primitive and easy to defeat. The Greek locks used a notched boltwork and were operated by inserting the blade of an iron sickleshaped key, about a foot long, in a key slot and twisting it 180 to work the bolt (Fig. 1.2). They could be defeated just by trying a few different-size keys. In about 800 B.C.E. the Greek poet Homer described that Greek lock in his poem The Odysseus:
Read Bar Code In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
QR-Code Maker In Visual C#
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in .NET applications.
She went upstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze and had a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the store room at the end of the house, where her husband s treasures of gold, bronze, and wrought iron were kept. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door, put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the bolts that held the doors.
Making Quick Response Code In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in ASP.NET applications.
Making QR Code In VB.NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Rome Like the Greeks, the Romans used notched boltwork. But the Romans improved on the lock design in many ways, such as by putting the boltwork in an iron case and using keys of iron or bronze. Because iron rusts and corrodes, few early Roman locks are in existence. But a lot of the keys are around. Often the keys were ornately designed to be worn as jewelry, either as finger rings or as necklaces using string (because togas didn t have pockets). Figure 1.3 shows some early Roman finger rings. Two of the most important innovations of the Roman locks were the springloaded bolt and the use of wards on the case. The extensive commerce during the time of Julius Caesar led to a great demand for locks among the many wealthy merchants and politicians. The type of lock used by the Romans, the warded bit-key lock, is still being used today in many older homes. Because the lock provides so little security, typically it s found on interior doors, such as closets and sometimes bedrooms.
Drawing Bar Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in VS .NET applications.
Code 3 Of 9 Generator In .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in .NET framework applications.
A Short History of the Lock
Matrix Barcode Drawer In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create 2D Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Intelligent Mail Generator In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create 4-State Customer Barcode image in .NET applications.
Cutaway view of vertical beam with tumblers
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create bar code image in Online applications.
Read USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Extra key
Generate Code 3/9 In None
Using Barcode generator for Online Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Online applications.
UPC A Scanner In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Keyhole (or arm hole )
Matrix Barcode Encoder In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in Java applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Recognizer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Key in hollowed out part of bolt, lifting tumblers
Creating Data Matrix In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Software applications.
Bar Code Encoder In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create bar code image in iPhone applications.
Vertical wooden staple
Figure 1.1 Ancient Egyptian locks relied on the pin tumbler principle that
many of today s locks use.
One
yyy yyy yyy yy yyy yy yyy yyyyy yy yyyyy yyy yyy yy
Figure 1.2 Early Greek locks had notched boltwork, and used a sickle-shaped key.
The Romans are sometimes credited with inventing the padlock, but that s controversial. There is evidence that the Chinese may have independently invented it before or about the same time. The demand for locks declined after the fall of Rome in the fifth century because people had little property to protect. The few locks used during the period were specially ordered for nobility and the handful of wealthy merchants.
A Short History of the Lock
Figure 1.3 Many early Roman keys were made to be worn as rings,
because clothing of Romans didn t have pockets. (Courtesy of TheLockMan.com/The First Internet Lock Museum.)
Europe During the Middle Ages, metal workers in England, Germany, and France continued to make warded locks, with no significant security changes. They focused on making elaborate ornately designed cases and keys. Locks became works of art. Keys were made that could move about a post and shift the position of a movable bar (the locking bolt). The first obstacles to unauthorized use of the lock were internal wards. Medieval and renaissance craftsmen improved on the warded lock by using many interlocking wards and more complicated keys. But many of the wards could easily be bypassed. In France in 1767, the treatise The Art of the Locksmith was published; it described examples of the lever tumbler lock. The inventor of the lock is unknown. As locksmithing advanced, locks were designed with multiple levers, each of which had to be lifted and properly aligned before the bolt could move to the unlocked position. In the fourteenth century the locksmith s guilds came into prominence. They required journeymen locksmiths to create and submit a working lock and key
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.