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Figure 8.28 Medeco biaxial pins. (Medeco Security Locks)
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Figure 8.29 Angular rotations of a Medeco biaxial key. (Medeco Security Locks)
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Figure 8.30 The locator tab is
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located along the centerline of the Medeco biaxial pin opposite the area for sidebar slot. (Medeco Security Locks)
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High-Security Mechanical Locks
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Figure 8.31 Spacing for Medeco biaxial keys. (Medeco Security Locks)
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Figure 8.32 Angles for cuts in Medeco biaxial keys. (Medeco Security
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Locks)
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Masterkeying
Masterkeying can provide immediate and long-range benefits that a beginning locksmith can find desirable. This chapter covers the principles of masterkeying and techniques for developing master key systems. Coding Systems Coding systems help the locksmith distinguish various key cuts and tumbler arrangements. Without coding systems, masterkeying would be nearly impossible. Most coding systems (those for disc, pin, and lever tumbler locks) are based on depth differentiation. Each key cut is coded according to its depth; likewise, each matching tumbler receives the same code. Depths for key cuts and tumblers are standardized for two reasons: It is more economical to standardize these depths (mass production would be impossible without some kind of standardization) and depths, to some extent, are determined by production. Master Key Systems In most key coding systems, tumblers can be set to any of five possible depths. These depths are usually numbered consecutively 1 through 5. Since most locks have five tumblers, each one with five possible settings, there can be thousands of combinations. Master keys are possible because a single key can be cut to match several lock combinations. In developing codes, there are certain undesirable combinations that cannot be used. The variation in depths between adjoining tumblers cannot be too great. For example, a pin tumbler key cannot be cut to the combination 21919 because the cuts for the 9s rule out the cuts for the 1s. Likewise, a pin tumbler lock with the combination 99999 would be too easy to pick. The undesirable code combinations vary depending on the type of tumblers, the coding system,
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Nine
and the number of possible key variations. The more complex the system, the greater the possibility of undesirable combinations. Masterkeying Warded Locks Since a ward is an obstruction within a lock that keeps out certain keys not designed for the lock, a master key for warded locks must be capable of bypassing the wards. Figure 9.1 shows a variety of side ward cuts that are possible on warded keys. The master key (marked M) is cut to bypass all the wards in a lock admitting the other six keys. As explained earlier, cuts are also made along the length of the bit of a warded key. These cuts correspond to wards in the lock. To bypass such wards, a master key must be narrowed. Because of the limited spaces on a warded key, masterkeying is limited in the warded lock. The warded lock, because it offers only a very limited degree of security, uses only the simplest of master key systems. Figure 9.2 shows some of the standard master keys that are available from factories. Masterkeying Lever Tumbler Locks Individual lever locks may be masterkeyed locally, but any system that requires a wide division of keys would have to be set up at the factory. A large selection of tumblers is required. The time involved in assembling a large number would make the job prohibitive for the average locksmith. There will be occasions when you are asked to masterkey small lever locks. There are two systems. The first is the double-gate system (Fig. 9.3); the other is the wide-gate system (Fig. 9.4). Double gating is insecure. As the number
Figure 9.1 The master key at the bottom of the drawing replaces the six change keys
above it.
Masterkeying
Figure 9.2 Factory-supplied warded master keys.
Figure 9.3 Double-gated lever
cuts (shown by dotted lines) should be avoided.
Figure 9.4 Wide-gated cuts are
preferred.
of gates in the system increases, care must be taken to prevent cross-operation between the change keys. For example, you may find a change key for one lock acting as the master key. With either system, begin by determining the tumbler variations for the lock series in question. If the keys to all the locks are available, read the numbers stamped on the keys. Otherwise, disassemble the locks and note the tumbler depths for each one. Next, make a chart listing the tumbler variations (Fig. 9.5).
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