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CHAPTER 34 ASP.NET
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Figure 34-27. The restricted set of tables
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The appearance of an ASP.NET Dynamic Data application is controlled by a series of templates. The template for the application home page is Default.aspx, and it is at the top level of the Visual Studio project. The templates for the screens for listing the contents of a table, editing a record, and so on, are in the DynamicData\PageTemplates folder. The name of the template tells you what the templates are used for: Details.aspx, Edit.aspx, and so on. In this section, we ll make a couple of template changes just to give you an idea of how it is done. First, we ll change the name of the application itself. It defaults to Dynamic Data Site, as you can see in Figure 34-27. This name is used on all the pages and is taken from a master template file called Site.master, changes to which affect all pages in the application. To edit this file, right-click Site.master in the Solution Explorer, and select View Designer from the pop-up menu. This will open a standard ASP.NET design surface so that you can make changes. I have edited the title at the top of the page to Northwind Data, as shown in Figure 34-28.
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Figure 34-28. Editing the master template
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CHAPTER 34 ASP.NET
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The second change we ll make is in the Default.aspx file, changing the default My Tables title into something more apt for our example. Right-click the item in the Solution Explorer, select View Designer from the pop-up menu, and change My Tables to Staff & Orders Tables, as shown by Figure 34-29.
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Figure 34-29. Editing the home page template We can see the effect of these changes when we run the application. Select Start Without Debugging from the Visual Studio Debug menu, and you will see something similar to the application shown in Figure 34-30.
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Figure 34-30. Customizing the ASP.NET Dynamic Data application Between the metadata classes and the templates, you can customize most aspects of an ASP.NET Dynamic Data application, meaning that you get the speed of rapid creation combined with the flexibility of being able to tailor almost every aspect of your application s appearance and operation.
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CHAPTER 34 ASP.NET
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Summary
In this chapter, we looked at two of the user interface components from the ASP.NET suite of technologies. The first, Web Forms, follows a similar model to the Windows Forms technology, allowing you build web applications by using controls, configuring them using properties, and responding to their operation using events. Web Forms is a very mature technology with a very wide adoption, especially in corporate intranet environments. We also looked at ASP.NET Dynamic Data, a relatively new addition to ASP.NET that makes it quick and simple to create fully featured data-centric applications. Web Forms can be used to create data applications, but the ASP.NET Dynamic Data feature is, to my mind, a simpler and more elegant approach for most ASP.NET projects.
C H A P T E R 35
Silverlight
Silverlight is Microsoft s answer to Adobe Flash. A reduced .NET implementation is installed on the user s machine and is used to deliver .NET content contained within web pages. Silverlight supports the mainstream browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Safari, and Firefox and works on Windows and Mac OS X machines. To a C# programmer, the attraction of Silverlight is that it is based on .NET. The Silverlight runtime doesn t have all the features of the .NET Framework, but it does have many of the core features that programmers rely on every day, including LINQ to Objects, LINQ to XML, the collection classes, generic classes, and more. There is a heavy emphasis on handling media and glossy user interactions. Silverlight user interfaces are based on Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), and network communications can be performed using Windows Communication Foundation (WCF). There are fewer namespaces available in Silverlight, and some classes have fewer members, but with a few exceptions, you can use most of the knowledge you have gained from this book in Silverlight. It isn t all good news, though. Silverlight doesn t have the penetration of Flash. At the time of this writing, the latest estimates are that Silverlight is installed on roughly 50 percent of Internet clients, as opposed to the 99 percent of clients that have installed Flash. A 50 percent penetration rate is pretty good, but it means you have to consider your target audience when using Silverlight, and, in particular, you have to take into account how motivated the user is to get your service and how much influence the user has over their environment. Your ideal audience is highly motivated to use your service and able to install Silverlight if they don t have it. You are likely to have low user adoption if you target a different audience. In particular, be wary of targeting large corporate users (who in general are not allowed to install new software) and casual audiences (who generally can t be bothered to install new software). I like Silverlight. In particular, I like the way you can use the C# and .NET building blocks to create highly interactive web clients in much the same way that you would build a regular Windows/WPF program. As we go through this chapter, you will see just how similar the development process is and how integration with other .NET features, such as WCF, can ease the development burden even further. Flash may be dominant, but if you have invested time, effort, and money on C# and .NET, Silverlight is worthy of serious consideration for your projects.
Note You must install the Silverlight 4 Tools for Visual Studio 2010 before you can follow the examples in this chapter. See 2 for details.
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