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This is exactly what you want to do for your light direction: you want to transform it from world space to tangent space: Output.LightDirT = mul(tangentToWorld, xLightDirection); You calculate the light direction, expressed in tangent space, and send it to your pixel shader. Since the normal you sample from your bump map and your light direction are both in the same space, you can immediately calculate their dot product in your pixel shader: float3 bumpColor = tex2D(BumpMapSampler, PSIn.TexCoord*xTexStretch); float3 normalT = (bumpColor - 0.5f)*2.0f; float lightFactor = dot(-normalize(normalT), normalize(PSIn.LightDirT));
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CHAPTER 5 GETTING THE MOST OUT OF VE RTICES
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5-17. Add an Ocean to Your 3D World
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The Problem
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You want to add an ocean to your 3D world. You could calculate the 3D positions of all your waves on your CPU, but this would consume a huge amount of resources, and the amount of data you send over to your graphics card each frame would be unacceptable.
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In your XNA application, you will simply create a flat grid consisting of triangles. This comes down to creating a terrain, as explained in recipe 5-8, only this time the grid must be completely flat. You will send this to your graphics card once. When it comes to rendering this grid, your vertex shader will add waves to the grid, while your pixel shader will add reflections. Your CPU has to issue only the Draw command, leaving the CPU available for more important work. Your vertex shader will receive the vertices of the grid and change their heights so the flat grid is reshaped into a wavy ocean. You can find the heights using a sine wave. A single sine wave would result in an ocean that looks too ideal, because each wave of the ocean would look identical. Luckily, all operations done on the GPU are done four times in parallel, so calculating one sine or four sines takes the same time. Your vertex shader will calculate up to four sines and sum them together, as shown in Figure 5-32. When you set the length, speed, and height of each wave individually, this will result in an ocean of which each wave is unique.
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+ + +
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Figure 5-32. Summing four sines
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CHAPTER 5 GETTING THE MOST OUT OF VERTICES
An ocean will look realistic only when it reflects the environment. In your pixel shader, you will sample the reflective color from the skybox (see recipe 2-8). However, these reflections would again be too perfect, resulting in a glass-like ocean. Therefore, in every pixel, you will bump map (see recipe 5-16) the surface of your ocean, adding little per-pixel calculated ripples to the large waves of your ocean. Finally, you will adjust the resulting color using the Fresnel term, so your pixel shader interpolates between a deep blue color and the reflective color, depending on the viewing angle.
How It Works
In your XNA project, you need to import and render a skybox, as explained in recipe 2-8. Next, you need to generate the vertices and indices for a flat grid, which is a simplified version of the terrain generation code presented in recipe 5-8. Use this code to generate your vertices: private VertexPositionTexture[] CreateWaterVertices() { VertexPositionTexture[] waterVertices = new VertexPositionTexture[waterWidth * waterHeight]; int i = 0; for (int z = 0; z < waterHeight; z++) { for (int x = 0; x < waterWidth; x++) { Vector3 position = new Vector3(x, 0, -z); Vector2 texCoord = new Vector2((float)x / 30.0f, (float)z / 30.0f); waterVertices[i++] = new VertexPositionTexture(position, texCoord); } } return waterVertices; } The grid is flat, because all Y coordinates equal 0. You re storing only the 3D position and texture coordinate inside each vertex. Create your indices using the method described in recipe 5-8. With your vertices and indices defined, you re ready to move on to your HLSL effect file.
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