birt barcode open source LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES in Font

Paint Quick Response Code in Font LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES

CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Denso QR Bar Code Generator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint Barcode In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 11-18. Powered steerable wheel
Code-39 Drawer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print Code 128B In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
NXT Conversion Cable
Encode GTIN - 13 In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create GS1 - 12 In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
LEGO sells an RCX-compatible cable for the NXT (see Figure 11-19). The large rectangular block in the middle of the cable protects the electrical connections. It allows the NXT to use both RCX motors and the Legacy Sensors.
ECC200 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print MSI Plessey In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Scan QR Code 2d Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting QR Code In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPad Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 11-19. NXT conversion Cable You can make your own with an NXT cable and an RCX cable. The adapter connects a 9V RCX cable to wires 1 and 2 (white and black) of an NXT cable. You should refer to 3 for instructions on cutting and preparing NXT cables. First, we ll describe how to make one with a screw terminal (you can see the different elements needed for a homebrew compatibility cable in Figure 11-20):
Read GTIN - 13 In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GS1 128 Printer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 11-20. Elements needed to build a compatibility cable
Code-39 Encoder In .NET
Using Barcode creator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 39 Extended Decoder In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Data Matrix Creation In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 39 Full ASCII Encoder In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code-39 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
1. 2. 3. 4.
Making Barcode In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UCC-128 Printer In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Split the two wires of the RCX cable and strip them. Fold the ends of the cables before screwing them in the terminal. Strip the black sheath of the NXT cable with a cutter and cut all color cables except the black and white ones. Strip the black and white wires of the NXT cable and fold them. The prepared cable should look like the ones in Figure 11-21.
Reading PDF 417 In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make Code39 In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 11-21. Prepared cables 5. Screw all the wires under the screw terminals (see Figure 11-22). Folding the ends and tightening the insulating material under the screw provides some strain relief.
Figure 11-22. Attaching wires to the screw terminal
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
The final cable is illustrated in Figure 11-23: it connects an RCX motor to the NXT.
Figure 11-23. NXT driving a 9V RCX motor Of course, it s also possible to make a soldered version of this cable using some heat shrink tubing to insulate and join the two sections of the cable, as shown in Figure 11-24.
Figure 11-24. Solder RCX and NXT wires together. Don t forget to insert heat shrink tubing!
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Figure 11-25 shows such a cable connecting an RCX Light Sensor to the NXT.
Figure 11-25. Using an RCX Light Sensor with the NXT
Power Functions Motors
LEGO Power Functions is a family of products designed to motorize the Creator and Technic line of construction kits. It consists of large and medium-sized motors, a battery box, and an infrared remote control. The motors can be used with the NXT, but require two adapter cables. The first is the NXT conversion cable previously described and a second cable that converts the Power Functions connector to the RCX 9V style connector. Of course, we ll show you how to make the conversion yourself. The medium-sized, or M-Motor (LEGO Shop PN#8883), is shown in Figure 11-26. It has the classic stud-style mounting system on the bottom as well as the studless style used with the NXT on its face. The motor speed is faster than, but not as powerful as, the NXT motor. However, it is both faster and more powerful than the RCX motor.
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Figure 11-26. Power Functions M-Motor One excellent use for the M-Motor is vehicle propulsion. Figure 11-27 shows how efficiently the motor can be connected directly to a wheel through the beam that makes up the side of the chassis. This method also works well for tracked vehicle designs. A symmetrically arranged motor on the opposite side of the vehicle allows for steering as well as propulsion. The disadvantage of using Power Functions motors is that you lose the position feedback built in to the NXT motors.
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Figure 11-27. M-Motor direct drive application The larger Power Functions XL-Motor (LEGO Shop PN#8882) is shown in Figure 11-28. It has only the studless NXT construction and for good reason. This motor produces so much torque it can easily disassemble weakly designed drive trains. An excellent choice for direct drive propulsion, it is highly geared down internally, making it the slowest LEGO motor.
CHAPTER 11 LEGO MOTOR INTERFACES
Figure 11-28. Power Functions XL-Motor
Power Functions Cabling
A closer look at the Power Functions connector reveals that it has four electrical connections in the small rectangular section. Figure 11-29 shows both the top and bottom view of the connector. The battery power is always available as the 0V and 9V connections. Switching elements, like the infrared remote control, selectively connect the battery power to C1 and C2. Motors are connected only to C1 and C2.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.