vb.net barcode component These instructions need to be carried out at the command prompt, so start by in Java

Painting Code 3 of 9 in Java These instructions need to be carried out at the command prompt, so start by

1. These instructions need to be carried out at the command prompt, so start by
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opening a GNOME Terminal Window: click Applications Accessories Terminal.
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2. You need to identify the Unique Udev ID (UUID) number of your Windows partition.
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This is simply the hexadecimal number that Ubuntu uses to identify the drive internally. If your computer is relatively new, it probably has an SATA hard disk, so type the following at the command prompt:
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sudo vol_id u /dev/sda1
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If you re using an IDE (PATA) hard disk, type the following to determine the UUID number:
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sudo vol_id u /dev/hda1
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These instructions assume that the Windows partition is the first on the hard disk, which will be the case for most users. If you know the Windows partition is the second partition, replace /dev/sda1 or /dev/hda1 with /dev/sda2 or /dev/hda2.
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3. You ll be prompted to enter your password; do so.
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CHAPTER 12 MA NA GIN G YOUR FILES
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4. Make a note of the output of the command. On our test PC, the line read
6284101A840FEEFB, but yours will almost certainly be different.
5. Now you need to create a mount point. This is a dummy folder that s used to make
the contents of the Windows partition magically available. The Ubuntu convention is to create a directory within the /media directory, as follows:
sudo mkdir /media/Windows 6. You need to edit the /etc/fstab file. This is the configuration file that tells Ubuntu
where to find all of the file systems it uses. This includes the root file system, without which Ubuntu can t operate, so you should take extra care when editing this file. To load the file into the Gedit text editor, type the following:
gksu gedit /etc/fstab 7. The file looks complicated, but don t worry. Simply scroll to the bottom and press
Enter to create a new line. Then type the following:
UUID=<UUID> /media/Windows ntfs defaults,nls=utf8,umask=007,gid=46 0 0
Replace <UUID> with the hexadecimal number you noted earlier. For example, on our test PC, the line within fstab read as follows (see also Figure 12-8):
UUID=6284101A840FEEFB /media/Windows ntfs defaults,nls=utf8, umask=007,gid=46 0 0 8. Click File Save within Gedit to save your changes.
From now on, the Windows file system will be made available automatically whenever you boot, and it should appear as an icon both on the desktop and within the Computer view of Nautilus (click Places Computer to see it). However, you can mount it immediately by typing the following command at the prompt:
sudo mount /media/Windows
Note You can write to or edit files in an NTFS partition. However, be aware that you could easily destroy
your Windows partition because on Ubuntu, all Windows files (even the system-critical files) can be overwritten without warning. On the positive side, this feature allows you to easily recover your files from Windows if it has crashed.
CHAPTER 12 MA NA GING YOUR FILES
Figure 12-8. By editing the /etc/fstab file, you can make your Windows partition available
under Ubuntu.
Accessing Networked Files
The easiest way to access shared folders on Windows workstations or servers over a network is to click Places Network. This will start Nautilus and attempt to search for Windows machines on your local network, just like with Network Neighborhood and My Network Places on the various versions of Windows.
Tip When using this method, if the icon for a computer or workgroup is a blank sheet of paper, click the
Refresh button on the toolbar. The icon should then change to a computer. In our tests, we found that we couldn t access the network resource if the icon wasn t set correctly.
If you ve ever used the network browsing services under Windows, you might already know how unreliable they can be some computers simply don t appear in the list, others appear eventually after a wait, and others appear but then prove to be mysteriously inaccessible.
CHAPTER 12 MA NA GIN G YOUR FILES
A far quicker and more reliable method of accessing a Windows shared folder is to manually specify its network name or IP address. The network name is simply the name of the computer that s used during networking. The IP address is the computer s identifying number and usually takes the form of four octets separated by periods, like this: 192.168.1.4. You should try using the network name first when connecting to a computer. If that proves unreliable, try using the IP address instead. You can discover the network name and IP address as follows: Network name: You can discover the network name of a Windows Vista computer by clicking Start and right-clicking Network on the menu. Click Properties on the menu, and in the window that appears, look at the name of This Computer on the diagram beneath the Network and Sharing Center heading. For example, the name of our test PC is keir-pc. To discover the network name within Windows XP, right-click My Computer, select Properties, and then click the Computer Name tab in the window that appears. Look under the Full Computer Name heading. IP address: To find out the IP address, open an MS-DOS command prompt. To do this under Windows XP, click Start Run, and type cmd. Under Windows Vista, click the Start button and type cmd into the Start Search text box. Under both XP and Vista, type ipconfig at the prompt. Then, under XP, look for the line that reads IP Address and note the details. Under Windows Vista, look for the line that reads IPv4 Address and note the number (on our test computer, we had to scroll up the window to see the line). To access a shared folder, open a Nautilus file browser window (Places Home), and then click Go Location. In the box, type the following:
smb://computer name/
Alternatively, if you wish to use the IP address, type the following:
smb://IP address/
Obviously, in both cases, you should replace computer name and IP address with the details you noted earlier. You may also be prompted to enter a username and/or password to access the shared folder, as shown in Figure 12-9.
Note If you re accessing a Windows 95, 98, or Me shared folder, only password protection will have been
set (these versions of Windows are unable to specify a username). However, when prompted by Nautilus, you still need to type something into the Username box to gain access anything will do, as long as the password is correct. You cannot leave the Username box blank.
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