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Encode QR-Code in Software Copyright 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. Click here for terms of use.

Copyright 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. Click here for terms of use.
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than 5 lb, fit into a briefcase, operate on batteries for two hours, have a mean time between failures (MTBF) of 200,000 hours or more, cost less than $2000, have 4 Mbytes of memory, 240 Mbytes or more of mass storage, and be MS-DOS compatible. This specification serves as the starting point for a new design.
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System Block Diagram
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Once the system specification has been completed, a block diagram of the major functions is created, showing how the system is to be partitioned and how the functions link or relate to each other. Figure 14.2 is an example of this partitioning.
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14.2.3 Partitioning System into PCBs Once the major functions are known and the technologies that will be used to implement them are determined, the circuitry is divided into PCB assemblies, grouping functions that must work together onto a single PCB. Usually this partitioning is done where data buses link functions together. Often these buses will be contained on a backplane into which a group of daughter boards are plugged. In the case of a personal computer (PC), partitioning often results in a mother board and several smaller plugin modules such as memory, display driver, disk controller, and PC card (PCMCIA) interface.
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Determining PCB Size
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FIGURE 14.1
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PCB design process steps.
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As soon as the amount of circuitry and the technology that each PCB must contain is known, the area and size of each PCB may be estimated. Often, the PCB size is fixed in advance by the end use. For example, a system based on VME or multibus technology will have to use the PCB sizes defined by the standard. In this case, system partitioning and component packaging technology will be dictated by what will fit onto these standard PCB sizes. The finished cost of a PCB often turns on the number of layers and the quantity that will fit onto the standard manufacturing panel sizes. (For most PCB fabricators, this size is 18 in by 24 in with a usable area of 16.5 in by 22.5 in) Sizing PCBs to utilize all or most of the panel area results in the most cost-effective bare PCB. (See Table 13.4.)
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Creating the Schematic Once the system function, partitioning, and technologies have been determined, the schematic or detailed connections between components can take place. Schematics and block diagrams are normally created on CAE (computer-aided engineering) systems. These systems allow the designer to draw the schematic on a CRT screen or terminal. The data needed by all of the following steps in the design process is generated by the CAE system from this schematic.
THE PCB DESIGN PROCESS
FIGURE 14.2 This is a block diagram of a digital device (in this case a disk drive) that has been segmented to its assembly levels. The dashed lines represent initial partitioning of the entire product to printed circuit assemblies and also shows the expected interface (connector) requirements.
Building Component Libraries The tools used in the PCB design process must be supplied a variety of information about each part in order to complete each step. This information is entered into a library or set of libraries, one entry per component. Among the pieces of data needed are:
Type of package that houses the component, e.g., through-hole, QFP, DIP Size of component, lead spacing, lead size, pin-numbering pattern Function each pin performs, e.g., output, input, power pin Electrical characteristics of each pin, e.g., capacitance, output impedance
Simulating Design To be sure a design will perform its intended function over the intended range of conditions, some form of design verification must be done. These conditions may include component value accuracies, range of component speeds, operating and storage temperature ranges, shock and vibration conditions, humidity ranges, and power supply voltage range. Historically, this has been done by building breadboards and prototypes and subjecting them to rigorous testing.As systems and their operation software have grown more complex, this technique has proved to be inadequate. To solve this problem, simulators have been developed that allow a computer to simulate a function without having to build it. These simulators make it possible to perform tests far quicker, more rigorously, and more completely than any breadboard or prototype could ever be expected to. Defects discovered by a simulator can be corrected in the simulation model with ease and the tests rerun before any commitment to hardware is made.
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