read barcode scanner in c#.net ITEM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 in Software

Drawer QR Code in Software ITEM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ITEM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Recognize QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
QR Printer In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in Software applications.
CPN 1016975 13r010c0 13r030c0 13r040c0 13r0r5c0 13r101j0 13r102k1
QR-Code Scanner In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Drawing QR Code 2d Barcode In Visual C#
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET framework applications.
GEOM smd0402 smd0402 smd0402 smd0402 smd0402 smd0402
Generate Quick Response Code In .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in ASP.NET applications.
Painting Denso QR Bar Code In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR image in .NET applications.
COUNT 1 6 2 1 1 3 5
QR Code 2d Barcode Drawer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET applications.
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
DESCRIPTION SPROM_ASSY cap, 1.0pF, sheet5 cap, cap, cap, cap, cap, 3.0pF, sheet6 4.0pF, sheet6 0.5pF, sheet5 100pF, sheet6 1000pF, sheet5
GS1 - 13 Generation In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in Software applications.
Code-128 Maker In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 image in Software applications.
REFERENCE C502 C519 C517 C531 C591 C500 C518 C581 C503 C504 C587 C618 C545
Code39 Creator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Software applications.
Making Bar Code In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
C533 C536 C571 C573 C617
ANSI/AIM Code 93 Generation In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 9/3 image in Software applications.
Generate USS-128 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Word Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Word applications.
FIGURE 18.18 A typical spreadsheet-style BOM file containing the customer part number, part information, and reference designators.
European Article Number 13 Creator In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in Java applications.
Code39 Creator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Font applications.
PRINTED CIRCUITS HANDBOOK
Creating ANSI/AIM Code 39 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in ASP.NET applications.
Generating 2D Barcode In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create Matrix 2D Barcode image in .NET applications.
1 COMPONENT 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 XYZ00002 13 14 15 XYZ00001 VENDOR NAME
Matrix Barcode Printer In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Barcode Maker In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create bar code image in Reporting Service applications.
DESCRIPTION VENDOR ID VENDOR PART ID
4--------------------------------------------------------------------CAP CHIP 1PF 0.25PF 50V COG 0402 KEMET MURATA TI C0402C109C5GACTU GRM36COG010C050AQ GRM36COG010C050AQ
KEMET ELECTRONICS CORPORA MURATA ELECTRONICS TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
CAP CHIP 3PF 0.25PF 50V COG 0402 MURATA TI GRM36COG030C050AQ GRM36C0G030C050AQ
MURATA ELECTRONICS TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
FIGURE 18.19
Typical simple text tabulated AVL file excerpt.
numbers [CPNs]). Lines 8 through10 and 14 and 15 are of the second type and represent alternative orderable part numbers (usually referred to as manufacturer part numbers [MPNs]). Line 6 translates as Part number XYZ00001 is a 1 Pico Farad chip capacitor of description CAP CHIP 1PF 0.25PF 50V COG 0402, whereas line 8 translates as to get the XYZ00001 functionality from Kemet Electronics Corporation, specify catalog number C0402C109C5GACTU.
DRIVERS FOR EVOLUTION
Data exchange for PCB manufacturing must evolve in two directions:
Technology-based evolution Improved means of communication in a high pace, competitive global economy
With the rapid advance of technology in the PCB industry, data exchange formats must adapt to include new information. For example, none of the CAD formats mentioned here and neither ODB++* nor IPC-2581 support buried resistors and capacitors out of the box, and therefore buried passive technology development is hindered by data communication errors and costs. Other technological challenges that need to be addressed are better integrated BOM, AVL, and CAD data packaging coming out of design houses, and tool support for specifications, standards, revision information, and ECO data in an online framework. With increasing trends toward globalization and supply chains, communication should be more than mere data exchange. The technology exists but is not yet utilized to its fullest extent. Online collaboration tools should replace file transfer. Means of maintaining issue lists and following up on their resolution would ensure that manufacturing requirements are met without compromising design integrity. Means of incrementally issuing design revisions without complete manufacturing reengineering would speed up prototype evolution.
* ODB++ version 7 to be released in 2007 supports buried passive resistors and capacitors.
INFORMATION FORMATING AND EXCHANGE
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The author thanks Susan Kayesar for her contribution to this chapter.
REFERENCES
1. Dean, Graham, A Review of Modern Photoplotting Formats, Electronics Manufacturing Tech-
nology, http://www.everythingpcb.com/p13447.htm.
2. Document 40101-S00-066A, Mania Barco Corporation. (http://members.optusnet.com.au/~eseychell/ rs274xrevd_e.pdf) 3. http://www.artwork.com/gerber/appl2.htm. 4. Mentor Graphics Fablink User s Manual. (www.mentor.com/) 5. ANSI/IPC-D-356, Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits, 3000 Lakeside Drive Bannockburn, IL, USA. 6. Valor ODB++ manual, available upon request from Paul Barrow at Paul.Barrow@valor.com; Tel, +972-8-9432430 (ext. 165); Fax, +972-8 9432429; Valor Computerized Systems, Ltd., P.O.
Box 152, Yavne 70600, Israel.
7. IPC-2581, Generic Requirements for Printed Board Assembly Products Manufacturing Description Data and Transfer Methodology ; IPC-258x and sectional requirements thereof, Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits, 3000 Lakeside Drive, Bannockburn, IL, USA.
This page intentionally left blank
PLANNING FOR DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND ASSEMBLY
Happy T. Holden
Mentor Graphics, Longmont, Colorado
19.1 INTRODUCTION
Advances in interconnection technologies have occurred in response to the evolution of component packages, electronic technology, and increasingly complex functions. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that various forms of printed wiring remain the most popular and cost-effective method of interconnections. Manufacturing, assembly, and test technologies have responded by improvements in their technologies. These increased capabilities have made selection of technologies, design rules, and features so complex that a new function has developed to allow for the prediction and selection of design parameters and performance versus manufacturing costs. This is the planning for design, fabrication, and assembly. This activity has also been called design for manufacturing and assembly or sometimes-predictive engineering. It is essentially the selection of design features and options that promote cost-competitive manufacturing, assembly, and test practices. Later in this chapter, we will offer a process to define producibility unique to each design or manufacturing process. Section 19.3.4 describes a process to define producibility unique to each design. The purpose of this chapter is to provide information, concepts, and processes that lead to a thoughtfully and competitively designed printed circuit, ensuring that all pertinent design and layout variables have been considered.
19.1.1 Design Planning and Predicting Cost Reducing costs to remain competitive is a principle responsibility of product planning. On the average, 75 percent of the recurring manufacturing costs are determined by the design drawing and specifications.1 This was one of the conclusions found by an extensive study that General Electric conducted on how competitive products were developed. Manufacturing typically determines production setup, material management, and process management costs (see Fig. 19.1), which are a minor part of the overall product cost.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.