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PLANNING FOR DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND ASSEMBLY
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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. + 0 1. 2. + 3. + 4. 5. + + 0 + + + + 2 3 2 0 2 + wins 0 loses ties FW C x
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EASY 1. Minimum Drill Diameter 0.050 " (1.27 mm) 1 10 20 0.022 " (0.559 mm) 30 40 0.018 " (0.457 mm) 50 60 70 0.011" (0.279 mm) 80 90 0.001 " (0.025 mm) 100 -
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FIGURE 19.9 Elements of the figure of merit process: (a) brainstorming factors; (b) grouping similar ideas; (c) ranking factors; and (d) assigning values to factors.
paired ranking, as seen in Fig 19.9c. Whatever the method of voting, the values are normalized by dividing by the smallest nonzero value. The resulting voting scores form the coefficients, Cx. Those factors with no votes are zeros and drop out of consideration. 19.3.6.2 Factor Weightings, FWx. Each factor that emerges from the ranking process is calibrated by assigning values from one (1) to one hundred (100), as seen in Fig. 19.9d. The 1 factors are easy to manufacture, and the 100 factors are impossible today but may only be very difficult in a few years. The resulting scoring equation will look like and be used as shown in Eq. 19.1. SCORE = (C1) (FW1) + (C2) (FW2) + (C3) (FW3) + (Cn) (FWn) + .... where Cx = coefficients based on ranking FWx = factor weightings of assigned values (1 100) (19.1)
For example, assume that the producibility of a bare PWB may be scored with the preceding equation if the FOM process established the following factors:
Size of the substrate: C1 = 1.5 Number of drilled holes: C2 = 3.0 Minimum trace width: C3 = 4.0
PRINTED CIRCUITS HANDBOOK
Now assume that the proposed PWB design specifies the following:
Size of the substrate: FW1 = 36 Number of drilled holes: FW2 = 18 Minimum trace width: FW3 = 31 The producibility SCORE would equal: 232 = 54 + 54 + 124 = 1.5 36 + 3.0 18 + 4.0 31
The SCORE can be used if it is calibrated based on the prior history of this type of product. Prior products are scored with the FOM linear equation (Eq. 19.1). Those products that went into production smoothly and presented minimum problems determine the minimum SCORE that should be sought. The SCORE from products that were a problem, had to be reengineered, or presented delays in introduction determines the SCORE that the design should exceed if problems occur and producibility is to be obtained.
LAYOUT TRADE-OFF PLANNING
Predicting density and selecting design rules are two of the primary planning activities for layout. The actual layout of a PWB is covered in s 13, 14, and 15. The selection of design rules not only affects circuit routing but profoundly affects fabrication, assembly, and testing.
Balancing the Density Equation With the need for more parts on an assembly and the trend to make things smaller for portability or faster speeds, the design process is a challenging one. The process is one of balancing the density equation with considerations for certain boundary conditions such as electrical and thermal performance. Unfortunately, many designers do not realize that there is a mathematical process to determine the routing rules of a printed circuit. Let me briefly explain. The density equation, as seen in Eq. 19.2 and Fig. 19.10, has two parts: the left side, which is the component wiring demand, and the right side, which is the substrate wiring capability. Component PWB Wiring Demand < PWBs Design Rules & Construction Wiring Capabilities where (19.2)
PWB Wiring Demand = total connection length required to connect all the parts in a circuit PWB Wiring Capability = substrate wiring length available to connect all the components
Four conditions can exist between wiring demand and substrate capability:
Wiring Demand > Substrate Capability If the substrate capacity is not equal to the demand, the design can never be finished. There is not enough room for either traces or vias. To correct this, either the substrate has to be bigger or components have to be removed. Wiring Demand Substrate Capability Although theoretically optimum,this condition leaves no room for variability and it would take an unacceptable amount of time to complete the design.
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