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TABLE 18.5 HALF-STEP COIL ENERGIZATION PATTERN FOR A BIPOLAR STEPPER MOTOR UP-DOWN COIL EAST-WEST COIL
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with to it attached to a double in-line connector that could be plugged into the breadboard (similar to the ones used in the servo experiments shown later in this chapter). Chances are that you will not be so lucky, and you will have to solder the individual pins to a single-pin in-line header that can be plugged into the breadboard.
Stepper Motor Connector
Vdd PIC16F684 SPDT 0.01 uF 1 14 Vdd Vss 5 6 7 8
Vdd L293D Vcc
RC5 RC4 RC3
Gnd Gnd
Gnd Gnd
+ 10 k Pot 6.0 V
RA4 RC2
Mot Pwr
Figure 18.15 An L293D is used to provide four half-bridges to control the movement of the bipolar stepper motor.
MOTOR CONTROL
TABLE 18.6 PART
BILL OF MATERIALS FOR BIPOLAR STEPPER MOTOR CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
PIC16F684 L293D 10-k 1000.01- F SPDT Stepper motor Misc. pot
IC16F684 04/P L293D motor-driver chip 10-k 100 single-turn potentiometer , 1/4 W resistor
0.01- F capacitor, any type PCB-mountable single-pole double-throw switch Bipolar stepper motor (see text) Prototyping PCB, 4 AA battery clip, four 0.100-in terminal block (see text), cardboard arrow (see text)
Before burning the PIC16F684 with the following software, I again want to suggest that you cut a sliver of cardboard as a pointer and Krazy glue it to the end of the stepper motor s output shaft so that you can clearly observe the movement of the stepper motor. When the circuit is built, you can burn a PIC16F684 with cStepper.c, which takes the information from Table 18.5 and uses it to create a simple table for half-step driving the bipolar stepper motor. In between steps, there is a quarter-second delay, and if your application is wired correctly, you will see the pointer you glued to the stepper motor shaft turning through 360 degrees (a degree or so at a time). If you do not see this pattern, then you will have to rearrange the wires on the terminal block until the motor starts working correctly.
#include <pic.h> /* cStepper.c - Turn a Stepper Motor Hardware Notes: PIC16F684 Running at 4 MHz with Internal Oscillator RC5:RC2 - Stepper Motor Outputs myke predko 05.01.15 */ __CONFIG(INTIO & WDTDIS & PWRTEN & MCLRDIS & UNPROTECT \ & UNPROTECT & BORDIS & IESODIS & FCMDIS);
unsigned int i = 0, j;
R/C SERVO CONTROL
const char StepperTable[] = {0b011100, 0b010100, 0b000100, 0b100100, 0b100000, 0b101000, 0b111000, 0b011000}; main() { PORTC = 0; CMCON0 = 7; ANSEL = 0; TRISC = 0b000011;
// // //
Turn off Comparators Turn off ADC RC5:RC2 Outputs
while(1 == 1) // Loop Forever { NOP(); for (j = 0; j < 21000; j++); NOP(); PORTC = StepperTable[i]; i = (i + 1) % 8; } // // elihw End cStepper
R/C Servo Control
Servos designed for use in radio-controlled airplanes, cars, and boats can be interfaced easily to a PIC microcontroller. They are often used for robots and applications where simple mechanical movement is required. The output of an R/C servo is usually a wheel that can be rotated from 0 to 90 degrees. (There are also servos available that can turn from 0 to 180 degrees, as well as servos with very high torque outputs for special applications.) Typically, they only require +5 V, ground, and an input signal. An R/C servo is an analog device that takes a varying length pulse, times it, and moves the output to the speci ed postion. For most RC servos, the pulse (shown in Fig. 18.16) is between 1.0 and 2.0 ms long and repeats every 20 ms. The position of the servo is determined by the time between 1.0 and 2.0 ms; the longer the pulse, the further the shaft will turn. While the PIC microcontroller s PWM is capable of outputting the correct pulse signal for an R/C servo, it will be unlikely that this will be accurate enough for precisely positioning the shaft. It is good enough for mobile robot applications, where the servo is modi ed to move in either direction inde nitely, and does not use a PWM signal, controlling a servo could be considered very easy, although the TMR2 output probably will not give you the positional accuracy that you will want.
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