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TABLE 21.25 COMMAND
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MIC-II COMMANDS OPERATION
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Nothing/ 1 R Register Register = Constant !Label Instruction Verb Noun
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Single-step the MIC-II processor. Execute one instruction and update the program counter (C register) Run the MIC-II at full speed from the current program counter (C register) location Return the contents of the speci ed register Set the register to a speci c value Specify the label position Load the instruction with parameter into the PIC16F84 s data EEPROM
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Labels are used in the application as in any traditional programming language. Jumping to B from the current execution is accomplished by referencing the label in the instruction as shown in the following code example:
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@ !B : B: ; jump on to Label B
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MIC-II label-assignment keystrokes.
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Here is a simple test program that you may want to try. It is designed to have four LEDs connected to the PIC16F84 s RB0 to RB3 pins and will increment them and then restart. I have written it with the labels on the start of the line. As I showed earlier, to put in a label, you will have to enter in the !Label command before the instruction. This command does not increment the C register, so you can enter the instruction right after it.
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< 0 > T > D ^ 0FF > P < 10 > E B: < D + 1 > D ^ 0FF > P < E - 1 > E < F # 1 @ !B @ !A A: ; ; ; ; ; Enable all the Outputs Use D as the Output Counter Invert the Data to Turn OFF the LEDs Loop Sixteen Times before Restarting Increment the LED Display
Invert the Count for the LEDs Decrement the Loop Counter
; ; ; ;
Check for being Done Skip Next if Zero is Set Not Zero, Repeat at B Start All Over Again
When this application runs, 184 instructions are executed before looping back to the start and beginning again. When I watched this on my oscilloscope (probing RB3 because this cycles once during the execution), it took 19.4 ms for an average execution speed of approximately 9,500 instructions per second. If you want to watch the LEDs changing, you could try the application listed below. This code calls a subroutine at C: that loops 256 times to provide a delay in the application so that it can be observed.
< 0 > T > D ^ 0FF > P B: < D + 1 > D ^ 0FF > P @ !C @ !B A: ; ; ; ; Enable all the Outputs Use D as the Output Counter Invert the Data to Turn OFF the LEDs Increment the LED Display
; ; ;
Invert the Count for the LEDs Jump to Label C Loop Back to B Forever
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< B > H < 0 > G D: < G + 1 > G < F # 1 @ !D < H > B
; ; ;
Save the Return Address Loop 256 Times Increment the Counter
Check to See if Zero Set (256x)
Return to Caller
This application is shown entered into the MIC-II in Fig. 21.49. To produce the listing, I changed the program counter (C register) value to the next instruction. In the application s subroutine, notice that I save the value in the B register into the H register. I did this because within the subroutine I perform a goto instruction that changes the value of the B register to the address following the @!D instruction. This is not the return address for the subroutine. When I rst coded the application, I forgot to do this, but I was able to nd the problem by stepping through the application (after changing the value loaded into G into 0x0FE or 254 to enable me to quickly execute the code in the subroutine s loop).
On-terminal emulator MIC-II subroutine example.
PROJECTS
NTSC VIDEO OUTPUT
Throughout this book I have used LEDs extensively to provide user feedback on the status of an application or its input. I also have used LCDs to display text data for users to allow complex operations to be explained rather than relying on panels with text or instruction books. For your home electronics, one of the output devices that you are probably most familiar with is the cathode-ray tube (CRT) of your TV, which is used to provide I/O for the TV itself, your VCR, DVD player, and maybe your stereo. If you ve looked at the different PIC microcontroller projects that are available on the Internet, you should not be surprised to nd that there are a number of different projects available for the PIC microcontroller in which it can be used to drive NTSC video output. In this project I would like to introduce you to National Television Standards Council (NTSC) composite video and a PIC microcontroller application that will show you how to process PIC microcontroller ADC data along with moving data. While the hardware is very simple and the software is also quite simple, this is one of the most challenging projects in this book. I do not address other standards, such as PAL or SECAM, but the generation of composite video for these standards is simple, and this application should be reasonably easy to port to these systems. This project demonstrates how ADC data can be captured while driving an NTSC composite video output along with computing the position of a bouncing ball. If you ve looked on in this book, you ll see that the circuit that I came up with for this application is extremely simple, but the code probably took me the most time to develop, and this was probably the most challenging project for me to develop in this book. The reasons for this is the stringent timing required by NTSC and the challenges I had in developing the simple displays used in this application. Before explaining the application, I should rst introduce you to composite NTSC video, as well as give you two warnings. The rst warning is this: For this project, I used a $10 television that I bought at a garage sale and used a $1.50 video modulator that I bought at a surplus store to convert the composite video that the PIC microcontroller circuit produces if you can t nd a similar modulator, you can use an inexpensive video game modulator/composite video switch that can be found at most stores selling audio/visual equipment. This signal is passed to the TV using a standard 75- coaxial cable. I did not modify the TV in any way (such as providing a bypass to the video preamp from the tuner), and I don t recommend that you do this either. There are potentially lethal voltages inside a TV, stored in capacitors that are still present even if the TV is turned off and not plugged in. While the circuit here should not produce any voltages or currents that could damage a TV, I don t recommend that you hook this circuit up to the family s large-screen TV (or any TV that you care about). Instead, you should look for an old 12-inch black and white TV that you can pick up for a few bucks. If ames come out of your family s home entertainment system, you only have yourself to blame. The second warning is: the circuit and software presented here are essentially a video transmitter. The modulator will convert the composite video to a frequency that may be picked up by your neighbors TVs on channel 3 (which they are probably using for cable converters, VCRs, DVD players, and the like). Please be sensitive to
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