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locations can also be speci ed manually or have their paths changed manually. This feature allows source les from different PCs and servers to be included in the build, creating an application that is the result of several persons efforts. You can have more than one source le editor window active in a project. Even if I am only using a single source le in my application, I will often load up the device .inc and other reference information les to application build so that they can be easily displayed on the MPLAB IDE desktop. The editor is Microsoft compatible, which means it works exactly like text editors you are probably familiar with, such as WordPad, and you can cut, copy, and paste using the PC s clipboard. When multiple editor windows are active, you will have to tile them or order them so you can nd the necessary information quickly; unfortunately, there is no tabbing of the windows, which would make the search for speci c information faster. The important thing to remember when you have multiple editor windows open is to keep track of which window has which le. Monitoring the status of the application as it is being simulated or debugged is quite easy with the various windows and the bottom toolbar available to you. The bottom toolbar is the only method discussed here which is not optional. It is always available with the PIC part number selected, the current program counter, the editor operating mode, and the WREG and STATUS register contents. The other windows are discussed in more detail throughout the book and provide you with the ability to monitor the changes in the registers of the chip as well as change their contents. In Fig. 3.16, I have arranged the various windows the way that I feel most comfortable working with MPLAB IDE. I like to have all the relevant information available to me at all times and I only use overlapping windows for the source le editor all others have their own location on the desktop that does not interfere with any other windows. The larger and higher pixel count display that you have, the more data you will be able to add to your MPLAB IDE desktop, providing you with all the information and interfaces required to develop your own PIC microcontroller applications.
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The build tools (assembler, compilers, and linker) that I discuss in this book are probably the most popular tools available for the PIC microcontrollers and each of them integrate well with MPLAB IDE. The nuts and bolts of this integration were discussed earlier in the chapter with the discussion of the les used or produced in the build process. Each of the tools discussed in the following sections can utilize these les, even though in the case of source code and include les the formats will be different for the different tools. There are other tools available for the PIC microcontroller and many of them provide the same functions as the ones listed here.
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assembler that can produce object and hex les for any PIC microcontroller processor architecture. The assembler can work with macros and de nes to simplify programming along with having the ability to create data structures. Errors and messages are passed directly to MPLAB IDE, and when you click on them in the build status window the cursor will jump directly to the error. The assembler is designed to work on more
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than just assembly language source code, it can also process and format table data and con guration fuse values. The assembler can produce object code for linking with other programs or pass its output directly to the linker for creation of a .hex le that can be programmed directly into a PIC microcontroller. This is the default tool for developing application code, and when I wrote the second edition of this book, I considered assembly language to be the basic method of PIC microcontroller programming. Over time, I have seen the ef ciency of high level compilers improve and I would say that the need for understanding and using the assembler has lessened considerably. That said, a good basic understanding of the various PIC microcontroller processor architectures and their con guration fuses and other features is necessary to successfully develop ef cient applications. If you have looked ahead at later chapters in which I have provided application code, you would probably be surprised to nd that only two types of statements are required for a PIC microcontroller application. This will be hard to reconcile because the applications in the book seem to be just full of various types of statements, each one seeming to provide a different feature to the PIC microcontroller. Actually, all these statement types are meaningless to the assembler: instead it just looks through the application code for instructions and an indication of the end of the code. The most basic application source I could come up with is called minimum.asm, which can be found in the code\minimum subdirectory of the PICDownload folder. This code clears PORTB and then clears the TRISB register, which enables all 8 bits for output. Once this has completed, the application goes into an endless loop. The code that does this is simply:
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clrf bsf clrf bcf goto end 6 3, 5 6 3, 5 4
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Comparing this source le to what I have produced in Chap. 21, you will feel like something is missing. I can say that nothing is missing from the perspective of what the assembler needs to convert the source code to a hex le that can be programmed into the application. The reason why this source code looks so different is that different statements have been added to the MPASM assembler to make applications easier for you to write. In this section, I will go through the various aspects of the source le and explain what the statements are and why you might like to use them. The two statement types that are required for an application are the PIC microcontroller instructions and the directives. The instructions are the application itself, and the end directive is a command to stop the assembler. The only requirement of these two statements is that they cannot start in the rst column of the le. Directives are instructions to an assembler. In the next section, I will list all the directives that are recognized by the MPASM assembler and what they do. In later chapters, I will discuss various types of directives (such as macros) in more detail and how they can be used to simplify application development. In this section, I will just introduce you to the basic directives needed to develop a readable PIC microcontroller application.
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