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Business operations or consumer functions Scope of change
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Telephony, data, and wireless systems and equipment
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What systems are in place among the customers, but will not support the new application
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What related data is not on this system What system(s) hold that data
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What users will not have access to the system Pay particular attention to users who might want access but who will not have it. Who will have no changes in responsibility in relation to support of the new system
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Table 5-2 Scope de nition matrix with inclusions and exclusions (Continued).
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Security
What security systems will the new application change What security systems will the new application interface with What issues of security a ect installation of the system What security procedures will change Customer security issues (including perceived issues), and how they will be addressed Identify anyone else who uses the application or information from it. Identify regulatory organizations and others who may contribute to system requirements.
What security systems are mentioned but are not a ected by the new system
Other people and organizations
Identify people who might think they will work with the new application who actually will not.
THE CONTEXT DIAGRAM
The context diagram is a picture of the product or service as it will appear in its environment when the project is over. We use it as a visual aid for the scope statement. It shows how our new product or service will t into the company, department, or the household that will use it.
Generic context diagrams
The generic context diagram for a product or service (Fig. 5-1) includes the product or service we are creating in the large circle. The surrounding boxes are external systems or components with which our product or service is likely to interface. In a systems model such as a context diagram, people or groups of people are considered to be systems. Where appropriate, we identify communication between external systems. The curved lines between the system we are creating and each external system or component represent the data ows that will move between our system and each particular external system or component. If we fully de ne these data ows and their transmission requirements, we have speci ed all of the interface standards that our system must support in order to function properly. If your product or service has di erent customer groups, you create a box for each one, as they will have di erent inputs and outputs. There can also be many peripheral stakeholders, and many linked products or services. For example, as illustrated in Fig. 5-2, a computer program that we develop
PART TWO A Project, Start to Finish
Fig. 5-1. Generic context diagram.
for a company might have employees in one or more departments as the customers. Peripheral stakeholders would include people who got reports from the computer program, but did not actually use it, and also support personnel. And the linked products or services would be any computers running the program and any other programs that exchange data with the program we are making.
Fig. 5-2.
Generic context diagram for a software application.
CHAPTER 5 Concept
EXERCISE
Create Your Own Template for a Context Diagram
For context diagramming to make sense, you have to try it out. And each industry would have a di erent basic context diagram. So, whatever kinds of projects you do, make your own basic context diagram. See if you can build a template that will get you started on the context diagram for any project. Or, if you do more than one di erent type of project, do one diagram for each. For example, if you are in marketing, and sometimes you design whole marketing campaigns, and other times you design individual advertisements, create a context diagram for a campaign, and another one for a single advertisement. Once you have created the diagram, try it out. As you use the template, you can improve it.
Creating a context diagram for a new product or service
It is not important that your rst draft context diagram be correct, and it almost certainly will not be complete. Developing the context diagram is an iterative process, and we do it by meeting with stakeholders, showing them the picture, and making improvements. The goal is to put down what you know, and identify what you do not know. The diagram may be full of question marks. (Here is a practical recommendation: In any document or diagram, put a double question mark wherever information is uncertain. You can then use as a search string to nd all un nished points when revising documents.) Your draft context diagram will identify a few systems, components, and people who will interface with the new product or service. For each system, identify the person responsible for that system or component, or someone who knows a lot about it. If you are not sure if someone will be a stakeholder, meet with that person and ask. Make a list of all the people, and get in touch with them. Meet them, show them the context diagram and your scope statement, and get them to help you improve it. In preparing agendas for those meetings, it is good to consider the following:  You can make contact by e-mail, but a meeting by phone or in person is better because it is easier to ensure mutual understanding, especially when trying to build a picture of products and services that do not yet exist.
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