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Introduction to ADF Model
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hereas the business service layer implements the nuts and bolts of your application processing, the View layer provides the UI components for displaying and interacting with the data. However, there is one essential piece of the Oracle ADF jigsaw that is easy to overlook: ADF Model.
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For any application based on the Model-View-Controller (MVC) architectural principle, where the business service is separated from the implementation of the UI, the two tiers need to be bound together. ADF Model provides this binding and is responsible for ensuring that a specific piece of data from the business service, such as an order item, is bound to an appropriate UI component, such as a table. Furthermore, if the user wants to delete an order item through an action like a button click, ADF Model ensures that the button is associated with the appropriate business service action to perform the deletion. This chapter gives an insight into ADF Model and how it provides the binding between the business service and the UI. ADF Model provides a number of significant benefits to the developer. The first is that it implements the physical binding of a UI component to a business service. ADF Model enables you to do this by providing a framework feature, called a binding container, that acts as the glue between a page and the business service. The second benefit is that ADF Model provides a layer of abstraction over the underlying implementation. So, regardless of how the business service is implemented, such as ADF Business Components, web services, or simple Java classes, it is always presented to the UI in the same way. This means that the View layer can be developed in a consistent manner, since the integration and interaction with the business service is always performed through ADF Model.
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The Data Controls Panel
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You have already been exposed to ADF Model though the Data Controls panel of the Application Navigator in 10. This panel shows an implementation-agnostic representation of the business service, as shown in Figure 11-1. In this panel, you can drag data collections, individual attributes, or operations from the business service onto a page and JDeveloper will prompt for how you want that business service element displayed as a UI component. Once you have chosen the appropriate UI component, JDeveloper automatically binds that UI component to the underlying business service. By using the Data Controls panel, you can quickly create data-bound pages without having to know much about the internal workings of ADF Model. However, by taking a closer look at the building blocks, you will be able to achieve much more.
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Introduction to ADF Model
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FIGure 11-1. Data Controls panel
The Building Blocks of ADF Model
There are essentially two halves to the binding problem: the business service has to be exposed in a consistent way, and a UI component has to know how to bind to that abstraction. In nonsoftware terms, you can think of the solution as being analogous to two pieces of VELCRO brand fasteners. One piece of Velcro, with loops, is attached over the business service, while the other piece of Velcro, with the hooks, is attached to the UI component. No matter how the business service is implemented, the UI component can always bind to it so long as it has the appropriately shaped piece of Velcro.
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NOTe As this analogy mentions, the UI component must use the appropriately shaped piece of Velcro. This is because different UI components, such as buttons and tables, work with the data in slightly different ways, and so require a slightly different shape to the binding. For example, a UI component such as a table must be bound to many rows and columns of data, whereas a text field is bound to only a single piece of data. You will find out more about the different bindings later in this chapter. But how does ADF Model implement the hooks and loops of the Velcro analogy The answer is that ADF Model provides the two halves of the binding solution: data controls and bindings.
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