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Page templates help you ensure a consistency in page layout; however, that only goes so far in ensuring a consistent application look and feel. Declarative components are another weapon in your armory and allow you to build reusable composite components such as a customer details panel or a toolbar of buttons. These declarative components can then be packaged up and used by the development team on pages just like regular ADF Faces components.
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Creating a reusable Customer Panel
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Let s take the first of those examples. Suppose that while designing the application, you find that there are many instances where you display customer information. You might find that the same collection of fields and data is being used on many different pages. Rather than creating this panel of UI components every time, declarative components allow you to build the component once, and deploy it into the Component Palette to be made available along with all the other ADF Faces components. Let s take a look at the steps for building, deploying, and then using a declarative component.
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Creating a Declarative Component
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Declarative component development would typically happen in a separate project from the main application development effort, so create a new ADF ViewController project. The next step is to create the declarative component in that project. Select File | New and, in the New Gallery dialog, select JSF and then JSF Declarative Component. This displays the Create JSF Declarative Component dialog in which you define information for the name of the component, the library name in which the component will be packaged, and also facets and attributes. As shown in Figure 17-3, enter customerPanel for Declarative Component Name and click Add Tag Library to define a name for the library. Create a tag library with Tag Library Name set to ComponentLibrary. Having done that, you now need to specify the facets and attributes. Just like a page template, a declarative component can have a number of facets, the areas within the component where the consumer of the component can add their own content. If you want to define a facet where the consumer of the component can add their own content, you can do so here. Attributes, as with page templates, are used as parameters to pass information into the declarative component. Since this declarative component is going to be displaying data, you need a way of passing that data into the component. In this case, define three attributes, one for each of the fields in the declarative component. As shown in Figure 17-3, add the three attributes
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FIGure 17-3. Creating a JSF declarative component
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FirstName, LastName, and EmailAddress. You will use these attributes to pass in the data values for each of the input text fields in the declarative component. You can now create and lay out your components by dragging and dropping from the Component Palette. Once the layout is complete, you need to assign the declarative component attributes to the appropriate UI component properties. In this case, the Value property of each field should be set to the appropriate attribute using EL; for example, #{attrs.EmailAddress}.
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Building a Reusable UI
This indicates that the value for this field comes from the EmailAddress attribute. You will see how these attributes are populated later.
NOTe For both declarative components and page templates, attrs is the default name for the collection of attributes for that component or template. However, you can change this by setting the Var property of the component or template.
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Packaging and Deploying a Declarative Component
Once you are happy with the layout of the component, the next stage is to package it up into a reusable library. Double-click the project to display the Project Properties dialog, select Deployment, and click New to create a new deployment. In the Create Deployment Profile dialog, set Archive Type to ADF Library JAR File and enter a name for the deployment. Here you are defining the information to allow the declarative component to be packaged up into a reusable library. You can accept the other default values by clicking OK.
You now need to physically deploy that library to the file system. To do this, right-click the project name and select Deploy and then the name of the deployment profile you just created. JDeveloper displays a dialog to indicate where in the file system the library is being deployed. Take note of the directory path to where the library is deployed. You will need this later. NOTe Generally speaking, these reusable libraries would be deployed to some shared location where developers who need the components could discover and use them.
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