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You can control user login access to your system with the /etc/login.access file. The file consists of entries listing users, whether they are allowed access, and from where they can access the system. A record in this file consists of three colon-delimited fields: a plus (+) or minus (-) sign indicating whether users are allowed access, user login names allowed access, and the remote system (host) or terminal (tty device) from which they are trying to log in. The
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following enables the user dylan to access the system from the rabbit.mytrek.com remote system:
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You can list more than one user or location. You can also use the ALL option in place of either users or locations to allow access by all users and locations. The ALL option can be qualified with the EXCEPT option to allow access by all users except certain specified ones. The following entry allows any user to log into the system using the console, except for the users larisa and aleina:
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+:ALL EXCEPT larisa aleina:console
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Other access control files are used to control access for specific services such as the hosts.deny and hosts.allows files used with tcpd daemon for xinetd-supported servers.
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Recall from 12 that you can control access to your files and directories by user, group, or others. This is a capability given to any user for their own files and directories. Access in each of these categories can be controlled according to write, read, and execute permissions. Write access lets users modify a file, read access lets them display it, and execute access (used for programs) lets them run it. For directories, write access lets them delete it, read access will list its contents, and execute access will let users change to that directory. You could allow anyone on the system to read one of your files by assigning a read access to its other permission. 12 describes how you can use the chmod command to set permissions, using the u for user, g for group, and o for other, as well as r for read, w for write, and x for execute. The following command provides read and write group permissions for the file ourdraft1:
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On Gnome, you can set a directory or file permission using its Permissions panel in its Properties window (see Figure 30-1). Right-click on the file or directory entry in the file manager window and select Properties. Then select the Permissions panel. Here you will find a table of boxes with columns for Read, Write, and Execute along with rows for Owner, Group, and Other. Check the appropriate box for the permission you want. Normally, the Read and Write boxes for user permission will already be set. You can specify the group you want access provided to from the Group drop-down menu. This displays the groups a user belongs to.
Figure 30-1: File and directory permissions on Gnome In addition to the read/write/execute permissions, you can manually set ownership permissions for executable programs. Normally, the user who runs a program owns it while it is running, even though the program file itself may be owned by another user. The set user ID permission allows the original owner of the program to own it always, even while another user is running the program. For example, most software on the system is owned by the root user, but is run by ordinary users. Some such software may have to modify files owned by the root. In this case, the ordinary user would need to run that program with the root retaining ownership so the program could have the permissions to change those root-owned files. The group ID permission works the same way, except for groups. Programs owned by a group retain ownership even when run by users from another group. The program can then change the owner group's files. To add both the user ID and group ID permissions to a file, you use the s option. The following example adds the user ID permission to the pppd program, which is owned by the root user. When an ordinary user runs pppd, the root user retains ownership, allowing the pppd program to change root-owned files.
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