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cat /etc/passwd | mksmbpasswd.sh > /etc/samba/smbpasswd
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If your users and their passwords are being managed by NIS, you would use the ypcat command to access the user passwords, as shown here:
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ypcat passwd | mksmbpasswd.sh > /etc/samba/smbpasswd
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You then need to change the permissions on this file to protect it from unauthorized access. The 600 option allows only read and write access by the root user:
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chmod 600 /etc/samba/smbpasswd
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At this point, /etc/samba/smbpasswd will contain entries for all your current users with dummy fields for the passwords. You then use the smbpasswd command to add, or later change, encrypted passwords. To add a password for a particular user, you use the smbpasswd command with the user's name:
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# smbpasswd dylan New SMB Password: new-password Repeat New SMB Password: new-password
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Users can use smbpasswd to change their own password. The following example show how you would use smbpasswd to change your Samba password. If the user has no Samba password, they can just press the ENTER key.
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$ smbpasswd Old SMB password: old-password New SMB Password: new-password Repeat New SMB Password: new-password
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You also have to make sure that Samba is configured to use encrypted passwords. Set the encrypt passwords option to yes and specify the smb password file. These options are already set in the /etc/samba/smb.conf file (described in the following section), but they are commented with a preceding ; symbol. Just locate the lines and remove the ; symbols at the beginning of the lines:
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encrypt passwords = yes smb passwd file = /etc/samba/smbpasswd
You can also use SWAT to make this change. In the GLOBALS page, select Yes from the pop-up menu for the "encrypt password" entry; then save your changes by clicking the Commit Changes button. Be sure to restart the Samba server with the following command:
service smb restart
Clear-Text Passwords on Windows Clients
If you want to use clear-text passwords for Samba, you must manually edit the Windows registry of each Windows client. This is a much riskier approach, because passwords will be transmitted across the network in clear text. On the other hand, you do not need to maintain a separate Samba password file (/etc/samba/smbpasswd). For all Windows clients, you need to add an entry in the Windows registry for EnablePlainTextPassword and set the entry to 1:
For Windows 95 and 98, the EnablePlainTextPassword entry is located in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINES\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\VNETS UP. If this entry is not there, you must make one. Select Edit | New | DWORD Value from the regedit menu bar and rename the entry from New Value #1 to EnablePlainTextPassword. For Windows NT, you create a registry entry in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Rdr\Parameters. Select Edit | New | DWORD Value to create the entry EnablePlainTextPassword Data: 0x01. For Windows 2000, you create a registry entry in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanWorkStation\Parameters. Select Edit | New | DWORD Value to create the entry EnablePlainTextPassword Data: 0x01.
Make sure Samba is not using encrypted passwords. The encrypt passwords entry in smb.conf needs to be commented out or turned off.
Samba Configuration: smb.conf
You configure the Samba daemon using the smb.conf file located in the /etc/samba directory. The file is separated into two basic parts: one for global options and the other for shared services. A shared service, also known as shares, can be either filespace services (used by clients as an extension of their native file systems) or printable services (used by clients to access print services on the host running the server). The filespace service is a directory to which clients are given access and can use the space in it as an extension of their local file system. A printable service provides access by clients to print services, such as printers managed by the Samba server. The /etc/samba/smb.conf file holds the configuration for the various shared resources, as well as global options that apply to all resources. Linux installs an smb.conf file in your /etc/samba directory. The file contains default settings used for your distribution. You can edit the file to customize your configuration to your own needs. Many entries are commented with either a semicolon or a # sign, and you can remove the initial comment symbol to make them effective. Instead of editing the file directly, you may want to use the SWAT configuration utility, which provides an easy-to-use, full-screen Web page interface for entering configurations for shared resources. The SWAT configuration utility also provides extensive help features and documentation. For a complete listing of the Samba configuration parameters, check the Man page for smb.conf. An extensive set of sample smb.conf files is located in the /usr/share/doc/samba* directory in the examples subdirectory. In the smb.conf file, global options are set first, followed by each shared resource's configuration. The basic organizing component of the smb.conf file is a section. Each
resource has its own section that holds its service name and definitions of its attributes. Even global options are placed in a section of their own, labeled global. For example, each section for a filespace share consists of the directory and the access rights allowed to users of the filespace. The section of each share is labeled with the name of the shared resource. Special sections, called printers and homes, provide default descriptions for user directories and printers accessible on the Samba server. Following the special sections, sections are entered for specific services, namely access to specific directories or printers. The basic organizing component is a section. Global options are placed in a section of their own labeled global. A section begins with a section label consisting of the name of the shared resource encased in brackets. Other than the special sections, the section label can be any name you want to give it. Following the section label, on separate lines, different parameters for this service are entered. The parameters define the access rights to be granted to the user of the service. For example, for a directory, you may want it to be browsable but read-only, and to use a certain printer. Parameters are entered in the format parameter name = value. You can enter a comment by placing a semicolon at the beginning of the comment line. A simple example of a section configuration follows. The section label is encased in brackets and followed by two parameter entries. The path parameter specifies the directory to which access is allowed. The writable parameter specifies whether the user has write access to this directory and its filespace.
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