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Then, use iptables to place a masquerade rule on the NAT table. First reference the NAT table with the -t nat option. Then add a rule to the POSTROUTING chain with the -o option specifying the output device and the -j option with the MASQUERADE command:
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iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE
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Then turn on IP forwarding as you normally would:
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echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
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Instead of masquerading all local hosts as the single IP address of the firewall/ gateway host, you could use the NAT table to rewrite addresses for a few selected hosts. Such an approach is often applied to setups where you want several local hosts to appear as Internet servers. Using the DNAT and SNAT targets you can direct packets to specific local hosts. You would use rules on the PREROUTING and POSTROUTING chains to direct input and output packets. For example, the Web server described in the previous example could have been configured as a local host to which a DNAT target could redirect any packets originally received for 10.0.0.2. Say the Web servers were set up on 192.168.0.5. It could appear as having the address 10.0.0.2 on the Internet. Packets sent to 10.0.0.2 would be rewritten and directed to 192.168.0.5 by the NAT table. You would use the PREROUTING chain with the d option to handle incoming packets and POSTROUTING with the s option for outgoing packets.
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iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -d 10.0.0.2 \ --to-destination 192.168.0.5 -j DNAT iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING s 192.168.0.5 \ --to-source 10.0.0.2 -j SNAT
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Tip Bear in mind that with iptables, masquerading is no longer combined with the FORWARD chain, as it is with ipchains. So, if you specify a DROP policy for the FORWARD chain, you will also have to specifically enable FORWARD operation for the network that is being masqueraded. You will need both a POSTROUTING rule and FORWARD rule.
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IP Masquerading with ipchains
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You need to specify forwarding rules for use by ipchains to implement IP masquerading. (See the mychains file in the previous section for another example of an ipchains masquerade entry.) The following example assumes the Internet connect host, the firewall, uses its first Ethernet device to connect to the Internet, eth0. If you are using a modem to dial up a connection to an ISP, the interface used would probably be the first PPP interface, ppp0. The second command appends (-A) the forward rule to the target (-j) MASQ (masquerade) for the interface (-i) eth0. The host machines on the LAN must specify the connected system as their gateway machine. The last command enables IP forwarding. To enable IP masquerading using Linuxconf's firewalling entries, select Forward Firewalling and click the Do masquerade check box for any firewall forwarding rules you add that you want to apply to IP masquerading.
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ipchains -P forward DENY ipchains -A forward -i eth0 -j MASQ echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
IP Chains (Kernel 2.2)
IP Chains is the precursor to iptables that was used on Linux systems running the 2.2 kernel. It is still in use on many Linux systems. The Linux Web site for ipchains, which is the successor to ipfwadm used on older versions of Linux, is currently netfilter. samba.org/ipchains/. Support for ipchains is already implemented on the Linux 2.2 kernel. For earlier versions, you must enable support in the kernel, rebuilding it with network firewalls and IP firewalling features (see 34). The IP Chains HOWTO, located in your /usr/doc/ipchains directory, provides an excellent introduction and tutorial for ipchains
and how you use it to implement a firewall. The HOWTO is in Web page format and can be viewed with any Web browser. The HOWTO features specific examples on how to guard against several standard attacks, such as IP spoofing, the ping of death, and teardrop. Like iptables, ipchains organizes its rules into chains. A chain is simply a checklist of rules. These rules specify what action to take for packets containing certain headers. If the packet does match a rule, it is passed to its target, which determines what to do with the packet. If a packet does not match any of the rules, it is passed to the chain's default target. The standard targets are listed in Table 40-7. Unlike iptables, ipchains has both a MASQ and DENY target. A major difference between iptables and ipchains is that ipchains does not treat masquerading as a separate processes. It is just another ipchain rule, not a separate process as in iptables. A target could, in turn, be another chain of rules, even a chain of user-defined rules. A packet could be passed through several chains before finally reaching a target. In the case of userdefined chains, the default target is always the next rule in the chains from which it was called. This sets up a procedure or function call like flow of control found in programming languages. When a rule has a user-defined chain as its target, then, when activated, that userdefined chain is executed. If no rules are matched, execution returns to the next rule in the originating chain. Table 40-7: ipchains Targets Function Allow packet to pass through the firewall. Deny access by the packet (changed to DROP in iptables). Deny access and notify the sender. Masquerade the packet. Used only in the forward chain or chains called from the forward chain. Replaces sender's address with firewall host address (changed to MASQUERADE in iptables and to a NAT task). Redirect the packet to a local socket or process on the firewall. Used only in the input chain or chains called from the forward chain (changed to a NAT task in iptables). Jump to the end of the chain and let the default target process it.
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