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LIMITATIONS OF MODIFIED SERVOS
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Modifying a servo for continual rotation carries with it a few limitations, exceptions, and gotchas that you ll want to keep in mind:
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I The average servo is not engineered for lots and lots of continual use. The mechanics
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of the servo are likely to wear out after perhaps as little as 25 hours (that s elapsed time), depending on the amount of load on the servos. Models with metal gears and/or brass bushing or ball bearings will last longer. I The control electronics of a servo are made for intermittent duty. Servos used to power a robot across the floor may be used minutes or even hours at a time, and they tend to be under additional mechanical stress because of the weight of the robot. Though this is not exactly common, it is possible to burn out the control circuitry in the servo by overdriving it. I Standard-sized servos are not particularly strong in comparison to many other DC motors with gear heads. Don t expect a servo to move a 5- or 10-pound robot. If your robot is heavy, consider using either larger, higher-output servos (such as 1/4-scale or sail winch), or DC motors with built-in gear heads. I Last and certainly not least, remember that modifying a servo voids its warranty. You ll want to test the servo before you modify it to ensure that it works.
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MODIFYING BY REMOVING THE SERVO CONTROL BOARD
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Another way to modify a servo for continuous rotation is to follow the steps outlined earlier and also remove the control circuit board. Your robot then connects directly to the servo motor. You d use this approach if you don t want to bother with the pulse width schema. You get a nice, compact DC motor with gearbox attached. However, since you ve removed the control board, you will also need to provide adequate power output circuitry to drive the motor. Your PC or microcontroller will likely not be able to provide adequate current; in fact, trying to control a gutted servo motor directly will probably damage your PC or microcontroller. A servo modified by removing its control board is essentially the same as an ordinary DC motor, and the control circuitry is exactly the same. See 18 for more information on working with DC motors.
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314 WORKING WITH SERVO MOTORS
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One of the benefits of using R/C servos with robots is the variety of ways it offers you to connect stuff to the servos. In model airplane and car applications, servos are typically connected to a push/pull linkage of some type. For example, in a plane, a servo for controlling the rudder would connect to a push/pull linkage directly attached to the rudder. As the servo rotates, the linkage draws back and forth, as shown in Fig. 20.11. The rudder is attached to the body of the plane using a hinge, so when the linkage moves, the rudder flaps back and forth. You can use the exact same hardware designed for model cars and airplanes with your servoequipped robots. Visit the neighborhood hobby store and scout for possible parts you can use. Collect and read through Web sites and catalogs of companies that manufacture and sell servo linkages and other mechanics. Appendix B, Sources, lists several such companies.
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Servos reengineered for full rotation are most often used for robot locomotion and are outfitted with wheels. Since servos are best suited for small- to medium-sized robots (under about three pounds), the wheels for the robot should ideally be between 2 and 5 inches in diameter. Larger-diameter wheels make the robot travel faster, but they can weigh more. You won t want to put extra large 7- or 10-inch wheels on your robot if each wheel weighs 1.5 pounds. There s your three-pound practical limit right there. The general approach for attaching wheels to servos is to use the round control disc that comes with the servo (see Fig. 20.12). The underside of the disc fits snugly over the output shaft of the servo. You can glue or screw the wheel to the front of the disc. Here are some ideas:
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