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16.3 Adaptation through Association
A robot can be programmed to make choices using associations as described in the previous section. Rigorously addressing this problem would certainly result in a reasonably intelligent machine, but a rigorous approach could easily be the subject of an entire book. For now, we will be satis ed to create a relatively simple program to demonstrate that the principles in fact work. As with biological life-forms, our mechanical creature must have some innate tendencies and abilities. These instincts will be used to evaluate situations in order to build the association memories that directly affect the choices made by the robot. The following discussion describes the general algorithm. The robot must have some built-in desire to roam its environment. It should have some natural curiosity to make it tend to try to go to places it has not visited recently. The robot s initial movements have to be random, but there should be some tendency to keep moving in the same direction once a direction has been chosen. 16.3.1 I FEEL PLEASURE I FEEL PAIN The robot must have some built-in way to differentiate between pain and pleasure. Our robot will encounter pain in several ways. Areas in its environment will contain briars where entering them will be interpreted as pain by the robot. The environment will also have a replace. Getting too close to the re will cause the robot pain. Finally, if the robot s movement causes it to collide with objects it will feel pain. One of our goals is to make the robot learn on its own to avoid the re, the briars, and collisions. De ning pleasure is a little more complicated. Our robot will need to eat because it gets hungry, need to sleep because it gets sleepy, and need to play because it gets bored. Satisfying these needs will create pleasure. Roaming through the environment takes energy so the robot will become hungrier. Roaming without purpose will increasingly bore the robot making it want to play, which increases the robot s need for food and sleep. Eating also makes the robot sleepy. In the program, counters will keep track of each of these needs and will be incremented based on the robot s actions. These counters simulate a living creature s biological needs. When a need exceeds a threshold value, the need becomes a motivator that affects the robot s choices. The need with the largest value will be the only one that currently affects the robot s behavior. This will cause the robot to make choices to attempt to satisfy the current motivator. Once a need is satis ed the next need will become the motivator. If two or more needs exceed the threshold simultaneously, the one with the largest value will be applied. If two or more needs reach the maximum, a priority will be applied. Hunger will have the highest priority followed by sleepiness and then boredom. Humans don t exactly behave this way. We do prioritize objectives, but sometimes we may make use of an opportunity that presents itself even though we were not seeking it. For instance if you are sleepy and are on the way home to go to sleep when a friend calls and invites you to an interesting party, with some nice people, you may postpone the sleep drive to go and play. Of course, if the need to sleep is large enough, it will overshadow other needs and desires. See Exercise 5 for a discussion on how this concept may be implemented in the simulation of this chapter.
TRUE INTELLIGENCE: ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR
16.3.2 ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS The robot will not be able to get satisfying sleep unless it is near the re to stay warm but not so near that it feels pain. There will be a garden area in the environment that provides food if the robot nds it. There will also be an activity area that provides some form of stimulation to relieve boredom. When our robot is born it will know nothing about these areas. In the beginning of the robot s life it will roam aimlessly around the environment. Whenever an action causes it pain, the robot will save that action and the related situation in its memory so that it can avoid the pain in the future. Likewise, whenever the robot feels pleasure (needs are satis ed) it will save the action and the situation that led to the pleasure. Furthermore, once an action/situation has been associated with pleasure, then actions that lead to that situation will also be saved as being associated with pleasure. This is very similar to the scenario described earlier where objects associated with a baby s mother are considered to be pleasurable because she was associated with food and warmth.
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