vb.net barcode scanner webcam Answer 2: You Can t Make Money Developing Secret Algorithms in Software

Making ANSI/AIM Code 39 in Software Answer 2: You Can t Make Money Developing Secret Algorithms

Answer 2: You Can t Make Money Developing Secret Algorithms
Code-39 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
USS Code 39 Creator In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
Gemstar did make money for a while using a secret algorithm, but only until someone cracked it. The ultimate problem, though, goes deeper. Think about it this way: How can you sell something without letting buyers see what they re buying
Recognize USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Printing Code39 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in VS .NET applications.
continues
Encode Code 39 Full ASCII In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in ASP.NET applications.
Code-39 Generator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Symmetric-Key Cryptography
Code 3/9 Creation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in .NET applications.
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Suppose, for example, that you sell a software cryptographic system to an e-mail vendor, enabling it to encrypt messages. How could you prevent this client, or anyone else, from looking at your code There are plenty of ways to reverse-engineer software, as shown in the RC4 story. Fine, you may counter, I won t sell my algorithm to just anyone. I ll make sure that only people I trust can use it. Is it possible to trust enough people to make money that way And how are your trusted clients going to use your algorithm About the only thing they could do so is store their data and talk to each other. But people want to communicate with others who do not purchase their algorithm from the same vendor. As a result, the algorithms must be standardized, and that means they must be public. The other problem with trying to sell algorithms arises on the buyer s side of the arrangement. If you want to use cryptography, you must employ a hardware device or a software program. The problem is this: Just as you have access to the product, so do attackers. Where did you get your hardware or software a retail software store, a business-to-business vendor Attackers can go to the same source and get their own copies. In short, if you use your own algorithm and want to keep it secret, you can t sell it. As a result, you can t make any money.
Make ECC200 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Printer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 image in Software applications.
Answer 3: Publicly Known Algorithms Are More Secure
EAN / UCC - 14 Creator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create UCC.EAN - 128 image in Software applications.
UPCA Creator In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in Software applications.
Let s say you re the purchasing agent for your company and it s up to you to decide which cryptographic algorithm to buy. Your company will use this algorithm to store data and communicate securely. Two sales reps offer their products. One warns, This algorithm is secure as long as the attacker does not know its inner workings. The other proclaims, You can tell attackers what the algorithm is and how long the key is, but they can never retrieve your sensitive data without the key. Which one would you buy If it is possible to build a cryptographic system in which the algorithm is completely known, and if attackers still can t break it without the key, isn t that system more secure than one that can be broken if the algorithm is uncovered Well, it is possible to build such cryptographic systems.
Draw MSI Plessey In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Software applications.
Bar Code Generation In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for Reporting Service Control to generate, create bar code image in Reporting Service applications.
continues
Paint UPC Symbol In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in .NET applications.
Print Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create bar code image in Reporting Service applications.
2
Painting Universal Product Code Version A In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPad Control to generate, create UPCA image in iPad applications.
Data Matrix Generation In C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in VS .NET applications.
When algorithms are made public, cryptanalysts and computer engineers get a chance to examine them for weaknesses. If an algorithm is vulnerable, you can choose not to use it. Otherwise, you can be confident that your data is safe. If an algorithm is kept secret, on the other hand, analysts will not be able to find any weaknesses it may have. Does that mean it has no weaknesses Not necessarily; it simply means that you don t know whether or not it is vulnerable. Maybe a cracker, lurking somewhere in a basement, has obtained a copy of the algorithm (remember, they always do) and has already found a successful attack. But this cracker has decided not to share the information. If you use the secret algorithm, all your data is compromised but you don t know it. When an algorithm is made public, however, that s no guarantee that it is secure. Maybe analysts have not yet found the weakness, and the basement-dwelling cracker has found it. But great minds thrive on finding flaws in public cryptographic systems. There s prestige (and sometimes a little money) in finding chinks in the armor. If the cryptographic community cannot find something wrong with an algorithm, there s a good chance that no one else will.
EAN 13 Generator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in ASP.NET applications.
Making GTIN - 128 In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPad Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 14 image in iPad applications.
Sources: See David Kahn s The CodeBreakers for the histories of the Enigma, Purple, and Navajo codetalkers. See Cecil Adams Return of the Straight Dope for the GemStar story.
To answer that question, let s consider what the word random means. You probably have an intuitive idea of randomness, and most likely it s correct. To be more formal than intuition, we could put it this way: If someone knows what the current numbers are, is it possible to predict the next numbers To put it the way cryptographers prefer, random values are simply sets of numbers that pass statistical tests of randomness and are unrepeatable. Suppose that you choose a few thousand numbers and ask a mathematician, Are these numbers random To simplify things and to conform to computer conventions, you make the numbers binary, meaning that they are sequences of 1 s and 0 s. The mathlete will draw on a set of tests
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.