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4 Most of us take for granted the storage of data as a technological achievement occurring independent of our recognition and operating solely as a behind-the-scenes process. The closest laypeople come to data storage is use of their floppy drive or in configuration of network tree designations for their particular compartmentalized information. Data storage is much more than this. It is an essential component of daily recognized and unrecognized computer activities. Within various industries, myriad tasks such as telephone communications, banking and automatic teller machine (ATM) transactions, airline reservations, radio or television programming, and e-commerce depend on fast, effective data storage. Storage area networks (SANs) serve as the preeminent emergent technology of today for bringing islands of information together. As stated in previous chapters, SANs interconnect servers and storage devices at high speeds called gigabits. Speedy connection times minimize the need for backup servers. Speedy connections improve interoperability, data management, and security. SANs eliminate network gridlock and are scaled to fit organizational needs. How do legacy systems interact in the SAN methodology, you may ask Within the last 10 years, the Internet has grown from thousands of users to millions (53.5 million in 2001). This increase, coupled with an increase in the amount of data generated by users and organizations, has resulted in information aggrandization. Statistics confirm that within the last 5 years, the growth of data storage has quadrupled. Businesses store approximately 50 times the amount of data now as they did 10 years ago. Data storage is expected to continue its increase 20 to 50 times over in the next few years. Internet storage is expected to increase at even faster rates. Growth of information and data storage overwhelms current systems that presently store and manage data. These legacy systems have proven to maintain unique considerations while adapting to the SAN environment. SAN developments have increased the speed, reliability, and capacity of mass storage technologies, which makes it possible to save limitless quantities of information. Storage compression has heightened nearly 100 percent every one and a half years. Legacy systems have generated isolated units of information, and computer technology has changed dramatically over the past decade, delivering a multitude of variables for data storage. These variables are not compliant with one another. Computers housed within the same
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facilities often are elementally different and incompatible. Yet each system maintains a unique data storage capacity and functionality. Variables such as these result in data that are not easily accessible across an enterprise. The connections through which these systems exchange data do not transmit mass quantities of information well. They do not process at quick rates; typically, they do so at a snail s pace. As exponential information and data storage growth continues, the difficulties in managing, protecting, manipulating, and/or sharing data mount statistically higher each year. The implementation of a SAN changes this trend.
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Configuring from Existing Legacy Systems
Seventy percent of mission-critical data are stored on mainframes, and until recently, the SAN community has all but ignored these legacy systems. Figure 4-1 provides an overview of an old enterprise or legacy system. The clients, or end users, work from their workstations, where stored data are backed up over the local area network (LAN). The LAN maintains UNIX, WINNT, Netware, or other legacy server types. Islands of Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) disks process and provide first-level storage of data that are then backed up to a tape library system. The legacy system as represented in Figure 4-1 requires scalability, higher capacity, and increased storage capacities, and a SAN will provide this through LAN-free backups. LAN-free backups enable the SAN to share one of the most expensive components of the backup and recovery system the tape or optical library and drives within it. Figure 4-2 depicts the evolution of a centralized backup. There was a time when backups were completed to local attached tape drives of the legacy system. This method worked when data centers remained small and each server could fit on a single tape. When management of dozens or hundreds of tapes became too difficult when servers no longer fit on tape, data centers began to implement backup software that allowed them to use a central
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