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Overflow, Underflow, and Roundoff Errors Unlike mathematical numbers, computer numbers are of finite precision. Integers have a finite range and floatingpoint numbers have limited precision and range. Attempts to increase a number above its maximum value will result in an overflow error. Decreasing a value below its smallest allowable value results in an underflow. Floating-point numbers are imprecise. This imprecision is called roundoff error. Example 1.5 Roundoff Error This program does some simple arithmetic to illustrate roundoff error: void main ( ) { double x=1000/3.0; double y=x - 333.0; double z=3*y - 1.0; } cout <<"x=" <<x; cout <<"y=" <<y; cout <<"z=" <<z;
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x = 333.333 y = 0.333333 z = -5.68434E-14 In exact arithmetic, the variables would have the values x=331/3. y=l/3, and z=0. However, 1/3 cannot be represented exactly as a floating-point value. The inaccuracy is reflected in the residue value for z. This example also illustrates an inherent problem with using floating-point types within conditional tests of equality. If one were to test (z==0) it would fail even if z is very nearly zero, which is likely to happen when z should algebraically be zero. Therefore, it is better to avoid tests for equality with floating-point types. The E-Format for Floating-Point Values When input or output, floating-point values may be specified in either of two formats: fixed-point and scientific. The output in Ex. 1.5 illustrates both: 333.333 has fixed-point format, and -5.68434E-14 has scientific format. Floating-point values with magnitude in the range 0.1 to 999,999 will normally be printed in fixed-point format; all others will be printed in scientific format.
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2 Conditionals and Type Conversion In this chapter: Input The if Statement The if...else Statement Relational Operators Compound Statements Keywords Compound Conditions Boolean Expressions Nested Conditionals The Conditional Expression Operator The switch Statement Scope
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Enumeration Types Type Conversions
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The programs in 1 all have sequential execution: each statement in the program executes once, in the order that they are listed. Conditional statements allow for programs that are more flexible in that the execution of some statements depends upon conditions that change while the program is running. This chapter describes the if statement, the if . . . else statement, and the switch statement and it also shows how to include simple input into your programs. Input In C++, input is analogous to output. Instead of data flowing out to the output stream cout, we have data flowing in from the input stream cin (pronounced "see-in"). The name stands for "console input." Example 2.1 Integer Input Here is code that reads integer input: int main ( ) { int age; cout <<"How old are you "; cin >>age; cout <<"In 10 yrs, you will be" <<age+10 <<". \n"; return 0; }
How old are you 19 In 10 yrs, you will be 29
The symbol >> is the extraction operator, also called the input operator. It is usually used with the cin input stream, which is usually the user's keyboard. Thus, when the statement cin >>age; executes, the system pauses, waiting for input. As soon as an integer is input, it is assigned to age and the program continues.
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Note! Notice that the preprocessor directive: #include <iostream.h> is missing from Ex. 2.1. It is required in any program that uses either cin or cout. Since nearly every program in this book uses either cin or cout, we will assume that you Will include this line at the beginning of your source code file. Omitting it from these examples simply saves some print space. We will also omit the return statement at the end of the main() function in all future examples. We preface main() with void to indicate to the compiler that no return is expected.
The input object cin is analogous to the output object coat. Each is a C++ stream object that acts as a conduit through which bytes flow. The bytes flow into the running program through the cin object, and they flow out through the cout object.
Example 2.2 Character Input void main () { char first, last; cout <<"Enter initials:\n"; cout <<"\tFirst: "; cin >>first; cout <<"\tLast: "; cin >>last; cout <<"Hi, " <<first <<". " <<last <<".!\n"; }
Enter initials: First: J Last: B Hi, J. B.!
This example illustrates a standard way to format input. The first output line alerts the user to what general input is needed. This is followed by a sequence of specific input
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